Monday, December 31, 2012

Samsung Galaxy Note II Review advantages and disadvantages

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The Samsung Galaxy Note II comes with a Super AMOLED touch screen size measures 5.5 inches with a resolution of 1280 x 720 pixels, and is powered by four Quad Exynos chipset with a 1.6GHz quad-core processor and 2GB of RAM.

Samsung Galaxy Note II is equipped with 8 megapixel camera and 1.9 megapixel front behind, and has a battery with a capacity of 3100mAh. Samsung Galaxy Note II is thinner than its predecessor, with only 9.4mm thick and weighs 180 grams.

Samsung Galaxy Note II is also equipped with S-Pen that comes with new features. Some of the latest features including Air View, which allows users to preview email content, S-Planner, Image Gallery, or video without the need to open the application. There is also a Quick Command, which allows users to open applications that are opened quickly.


Samsung Galaxy Note II is available in three internal memory options of 16GB, 32GB, and 64GB plus a microSD slot support up to 32GB. This device will be available in Europe and the United States in October 2012, and following other region thereafter.


Samsung Galaxy Note II Main Features and Advantages

Quad-band GSM and quad-band 3G with 21 Mbps HSDPA and 5.76 Mbps HSUPA support
Optional LTE connectivity
5.5" 16M-color Super AMOLED capacitive touchscreen of HD (720 x 1280 pixel) resolution; Corning Gorilla Glass 2
Android OS v4.1 with TouchWiz launcher
1.6 GHz quad-core Cortex-A9 CPU, Mali-400MP GPU, 2GB of RAM, Exynos 4412 Quad chipset
S Pen active stylus with deep system integration
8 MP wide-angle lens autofocus camera with LED flash, face, smile and blink detection
1080p HD video recording at 30fps
16/32/64GB internal storage, microSD slot
Dual-band Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n support
GPS with A-GPS connectivity; GLONASS support, Digital compass
NFC support
Stereo Bluetooth v4.0
FM radio with RDS
microUSB port with USB host and TV-out (1080p) support, MHL, charging
Accelerometer, gyroscope and proximity sensor
Standard 3.5 mm audio jack
Great audio quality
Very slim at only 9.4mm
1.9MP secondary video-call camera
Document editor and file manager comes preinstalled
Extremely rich video and audio codec support
Huge 3100 mAh battery


Samsung Galaxy Note II Main disadvantages

Large size makes single-hand operation problematic
No dedicated camera key
All plastic construction (would have probably weighed a ton otherwise, though)
S Pen not as good as on the Note 10.1



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Wednesday, December 5, 2012

Sony Xperia E Release date and specs

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Sony Xperia E is an affordable and compact for today's standards featuring Sony's recognizable design language. The stand-out feature Sony wants us to note in the Xperia E is HD Voice, the purpose of which is to noticeably boost the sound quality of phone calls. When it comes to specs, the Xperia E will deliver a mid-range experience with its 3.5" HVGA touchscreen and 1GHz processor. Let's hope that Jelly Bean's Project Butter will help get rid of the lag. Sony also claims that we'll be surprised by the battery life of the device. The 1500 mAh battery will benefit from a special extended stand-by mode designed to increase overall battery life. Basically, when the phone's sleeping, it will disable all functions except for calling and messaging, and once you wake it up, all functions will be restored to their normal state. Of course, users will be able to enjoy Sony's "Walkman" music experience, as well as the xLOUD sound technology, which works really well in most Sony smartphones.



Sony has unveiled a new budget handset in the Xperia E, which will ship with Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich.

The smartphone, scheduled for a release during Q1 2013, sports a 3.5-inch HVGA 480x320 pixel resolution LCD, which should deliver a pixel density of about 165 pixels-per-inch.

Powering the device is a 1GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon S1 MSM7227A single-core processor, alongside 512MB of RAM and an Adreno 200 graphics processing unit.

As well as the the re-branded TimeScape UI, now known as the Sony UI, and 4GB of internal storage space with a MicroSD expansion slot, the Xperia E features a rear-facing 3.2-megapixel camera.

Sony has particularly singled out the device's xLOUD audio technology and 3D surround sound support, accompanied by HD voice and noise cancellation.

A 1,530mAh battery pack delivers up to 530 hours on standby or six hours of talk-time, Sony said. The smartphone itself will be available in black, white and pink.

If we find out more about an exact release date or pricing we will let you know. Would you buy the Xperia E or E dual for about $200 without a contract ?

Release date: Q1 2013
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Galaxy Note™ II Smart Dock Avilable

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Overview

The Samsung Galaxy Smart Dock makes it easy to take advantage your phone’s high-speed internet connectivity and super-fast processor. Connect an HD monitor, external storage device, and USB keyboard and mouse to turn your smartphone into a productivity powerhouse. Make messaging, editing documents and accessing media files a breeze. Plug in your 3.5mm stereo audio components or speakers and you have the ultimate pocket-sized home theater and computer in one.


 With its 5.5-inch screen, the Galaxy Note II terminal is already the most productivity-oriented product, but Samsung goes further by revealing the "Smart Dock" docking station.


While Motorola has recently announced the abandonment of the solution Webtop inaugurated on the Atrix, Samsung takes more or less the same estate.

The "Galaxy Note II Smart Dock" is actually similar to the "HD Multimedia Dock". It allows to connect the monitor, keyboard, mouse and other peripherals to the smartphone. The Android is displayed in full and it is not a Linux environment. It's less embarrassing than the time of the Atrix, since Android 4.1 Jelly Bean adapts well to high definition.

features

3.5mm Stereo Out
Stream stereo sound to your speakers or stereo components.
HDMI™ Out
Work, play or view media on large monitors and HD TVs Standard USB Out (X3) Connect compatible keyboards, mice, external storage and other input devices.
Versatility
Functions whether or not a Flip Cover and most slim case options are installed.
Fully Functional
Your phone is fully functional while charging in the Smart Dock. Watch your handset stream news, local weather, or just play with your apps…all while charging!




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Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Apple iOS 6.1 Takes a Step Closer to Release

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Those who are part of Apple's developers program received the third beta of iOS 6.1 today. This new version will likely be available to the public soon.

Developers report that there are no dramatic changes coming in iOS 6.1. Among the more notable changes: Apple is carrying out its promise to improve the Maps navigation software, there are small enhancements to the Safari web browser, and Passbook's system for handling boarding passes is getting new features.

Apple could release this update at any time it feels it has sufficiently de-bugged it. It's possible the company might wait until some big event, like the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in early January, however.

Apple's usual practice is to introduce iOS updates for all supported devices at once, including iPhones and iPads.






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Unlocked Apple iPhone 5 Now Available

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Those in the U.S. who would like Apple's latest smartphone but aren't into commitment or contracts can now buy an unlocked version of the iPhone 5.

Unlike the units sold by telecoms, this version can be used with any GSM carrier just be inserting a micro-SIM card. This includes AT&T, T-Mobile, and many more. Apple warns it doesn't support every type of 4G LTE, however.

Phones that are sold through carriers with contracts are subsidized -- the carrier reduces the up-front cost and gradually makes its money back from the service fees paid by customers. When devices are sold without contracts, there are no subsidies.

That's why the contract-free version of the iPhone 5 with 16GB of storage is $700, not $200. The 32GB version is $800, and the 64GB is $900.

This smartphone has been on the market for two months, but is only now being made available unlocked because demand for the carrier versions has been so strong that Apple couldn't make units fast enough, while there were also production problems.


Don't miss  review of the Apple iPhone 5.


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LG Optimus 4X HD review

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LG’s Optimus 4X HD is the company’s new flagship handset, and it’s certainly not messing around with the specifications. There’s a 4.7in 1,280x720 IPS screen, an Nvidia Tegra 3 chipset with a 1.5GHz quad-core processor and an eight-megapixel camera with a backlit sensor. This puts it up against top-of-the-range phones – such as the HTC One X and award-winning Samsung Galaxy S3.

The 4X HD doesn’t look as fancy as the One X and S3; instead of a curved screen and rounded pebble shape you get a more standard rounded rectangle. It’s easy to maintain a solid hold on the phone thanks to a textured back, and two parallel chromed plastic ridges around the edge provide grip for your thumb and fingers. The outside of the phone is sparse, with just a power button, volume rocker, headphone jack and Micro USB port; you don’t get a dedicated camera button, and have to pop the back cover off to get at the microSD card slot.
The 4.7in screen takes up most of the front of the phone, and it’s an impressive display. There’s no AMOLED display, as on the Galaxy S3, but it is a superior IPS-type LCD. There’s slightly less contrast than on the Galaxy S3, but the operating system, photos and videos still look great; the screen is definitely a match for the IPS model on the HTC One X. The 1,280x720 resolution is the same as that of the One X and Galaxy S3, and gives a pixel density of 313 pixels-per-inch – comparable to the 312 of the One X and 306 of the Galaxy S3. You can’t see the pixels, at any rate, and we can’t imagine anyone having any complaints about the display.
LG has heavily customised the handset’s Android 4.0 operating system. Many of the icons are LG’s own, and they’re big, bright and colourful, and work well with the large, high-resolution screen. Like stock Android 4.0, the main app screen is divided into Apps and Widgets, but the 4X HD also gives you a separate section for the apps you have downloaded.

There are some useful preinstalled apps. LG’s own video player has a preview which lets you scan through videos with a picture-in-picture box without leaving your current place. You can also pinch-to-zoom and pan around while a video is playing. The SmartShare DLNA app lets you play back media files stored on DLNA servers, and also control playback on other DLNA devices from the phone. The only app we didn’t get on with was LG’s own email app; it wouldn’t let us connect to our company Exchange server due to a problem with SSL certificates – most Android email apps have the option to accept all SSL certificates, so getting around our Exchange server’s quirks, but this is absent from LG’s app.


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iPhone 5S / iPhone 6 patent-inspired concept revealed

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Apple's iPhone 5S / iPhone 6 may have been revealed early, if this render is anything to go by. A graphic designer has turned to Apple's patent portfolio to produce 3D rendered images that guess at the design, features and functionality of the company's next-generation iPhone.

Designed to replace the current-generation iPhone 5, it's no secret that Apple is working on the iPhone 6 - but, as is traditional, the company is playing its cards close to its chest, refusing to divulge details ahead of launch for fear of damaging sales of its existing iPhone models.

To whet fans' appetites, InventHelp's Nickolay Lamm has scoured Apple's portfolio of patents for recent filings that may point to research carried out for the iPhone 6's design, using them to provide details to a graphic designer to produce product renders that offer a glimpse of one possible direction the company may be taking for the smartphone.
"I feel that the sales success of the iPhone 5 overlooks the fact that it was a pretty boring phone," Lamm said. "I looked at all of Apple’s recent patents and chose four which Apple may include in the iPhone 6 or later version. I then hired a 3D graphic designer to illustrate each of these patents so that the illustrations were as realistic as possible. I gave him very specific guidelines to follow."


The designer, Matteo Gianni, has generated the photo-realistic images based on Apple's current design ethos, and has based their technologies on patents recently filed by the company. Some features, however, are more likely than others: the suggestion that Apple's iOS platform will get integrated augmented reality functionality, dubbed 'Transparent Mode,' seems more than believable, but the suggestion that the iPhone 6 will feature a hybrid LCD and E Ink display, capable of being viewed in full sunlight and boosting battery life considerably, seems less so given how recent the company's patent on the matter is.

Other suggested product features include a 'smart bezel' which moves controls to the edge of the screen, meaning it's possible to use the phone without obscuring the display with your fingers, and an integral projector - a feature already making its way to rival devices.



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Sunday, December 2, 2012

Nokia Lumia 900 Review

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Let me start off this review by saying that the Nokia Lumia 900 is what the Nokia’s flagship Windows Phone 7.5 should have been. The Nokia Lumia 800 felt like a rush job and Nokia Lumia 900 felt just right. Unfortunately, Microsoft just killed all the current Windows Phones out in the market with the announcement of Windows Phone 8 by saying that all current Windows Phone will not be upgradable to Windows Phone 8 and that includes the Nokia Lumia series.

If you are still interested in getting a Nokia Lumia 900, it is currently retailing for SGD$849 (including taxes & without contract) at all 3 operators (SingTel, M1, StarHub) in Singapore. I do hope that Nokia have some sort of attractive trade-in offers for current Lumia owners to upgrade to a new Lumia with Windows Phone 8 that will be announced at Nokia World 2012 (wild guess).


Specifications



Operating: Windows Phone Release 7.5 – Mango Commercial Release 2 (Mango + LTE)
Processor: 1.4GHz Snapdragon APQ8055 + MDM9200
Networks: WCDMA 850/900/1900/2100, GSM/EDGE 850/900/1800/1900
Speed: HSDPA+ Dual Carrier cat 24 (42 Mbps), HSUPA cat 6: 5.8 Mbps
4.3″ ClearBlack AMOLED display with WVGA 800×480 resolution
512MB RAM
16 GB internal memory (14.5GB user memory)
Primary (Rear-facing): 8MP with f2.2/28mm Carl Zeiss lens and dual LED flash, Auto Focus, 720p, 30fps video capture
Secondary (Front-facing): 1MP with f2.4, 30fps video capture (VGA video call resolution)
A-GPS, Wi-Fi (802.11 b/g/n), USB 2.0 high-speed, Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR, 3.5mm headset connector
1,830mAh battery
Accelerometer, Proximity, Magnetometer, light sensor, Gyroscope
Volume: 90cc
Weight: 160 g (5.6 ounces)
Dimensions (max): 127.8 x 68.5 x 11.5 mm (5 x 2.7 x .45 inches)



The screen is a 4.3″ ClearBlack AMOLED display with a resolution of 800×480 and most importantly, it is visible under direct sunlight!

There are 3 soft keys at the bottom, the back button, the home button and the search button.

Pressing and holding the back button, it will bring you the multitasking sceen as show below.
Pressing and holding on the home button will bring about Microsoft Tellme which is essentially a Microsoft version of Siri (voice control).
Pressing on the search button will bring up the Bing search screen.


Source


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Showing Prototype from Sony C650X with Widescreen Revolution

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Sony middle borrows by completing a major project they to create 2 units of a Smartphone with a large screen, it is Semartphone Both Sony C660X and Sony C650X. The following is the appearance on the Internet in an appearance prediction from Sony C650X

In the picture above is quite clear screen that appears quite wide and has a very thin bezel. But the pity is that in the picture on the phone does not turn on the position. So, we cannot predict what applications appear on the home screen.

Rumors were circulating already become hots news at all gadget lovers. Mobile is going to proclaim the article in the competition for the Galaxy Note II or Optimus Vu. Most likely Sony C650X Odin comes with a 5-inch screen. And will be supported memory access speed quad core 1.5GHz processor from Qualcomm.

Officially, the Sony has not testified at all, but most likely also widescreen Smartphone will be showing at CES 201


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Friday, November 30, 2012

Nexus 4 wireless charging

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One of the more notable features that happened to find its way inside the Google Nexus 4 was its wireless charging capabilities. Compatible with the Wireless Power Consortium’s (WPC) Qi standard, this allows for the Nexus 4 to charge wirelessly with compatible docks right out of the box. No need for special battery covers, or ugly cases — it’s all built right in.

When Google first announced the Nexus 4, they talked briefly about a wireless charging dock for the device that they would, at some point, sell directly from the Google Play Store. We haven’t heard anything since, but if you’re looking to get in on some wireless charging of your very own, there’s no need to wait around for Google to appease you. There are plenty of Qi enabled wireless charging stations available right now from manufacturers like LG and Energizer.

While LG’s charging pad  seemed to work fine in the short 3 minutes of the video, I did find that it was a bit finicky and would disconnect/reconnect after a few minutes time. This resulted in a loud beeping noise coming from the pad letting you know it was connected, but for light sleepers out there, it may prove troublesome.


Energizer also has their wireless charging pads (you can find ‘em at retail stores like Target or Walmart), and reviews seem to be mixed when it comes to Nexus 4 users. The glass backing on the Nexus 4 causes the device to slip around and because Energizer’s pads are on a slight incline, they could cause the phone to completely slide off the pad altogether. You can see where a bumper case would come in handy for added grip (or a can of Plasti-Dip). Energizer’s pad did fare better in the rest of the review, keeping the device charging constantly, and requiring little-to-no fuss in regards to placement.

While the convenience of wireless charging is still under some review (holding your device while it’s charging is pretty much out of the question), there is a definite effort to bring wireless charging into the mainstream. The only problem, like most things, is there’s 2 main camps fighting to become that standard: Duracell/Powermat’s Power Matters Alliance, backed by AT&T, Starbucks, at Google — and the Wireless Power Consortium. Who will come out on top is anyone’s guess.



Source

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Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Microsoft's first Windows Phone 8 update dubbed Apollo Plus?

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Here's a quick refresher on code names. The Windows Phone team has been all about the o's. Windows Phone 7 OS was code-named NoDo. Then there was Mango (Windows Phone 7.5). A minor interim update arrived next, code-named Tango. And Windows Phone 8 OS was code-named Apollo. Joe Belfiore(o), manager of the Windows Phone Program, said awhile back that the team was finished with code names ending in "o."
So what was Windows Phone 8's successor going to be called?
Winsyde.com posted earlier today that the next release will be code-named "Apollo +," and that it would be available in Q1 2013 -- citing the @Football4PDA Twitter account as the source. The Verge subsequently posted that the code name of Windows Phone OS 8's follow-on would be "Apollo Plus." (Maybe the ban on code names ending with "o" doesn't start till Windows Phone 9 OS?)


The Verge's Tom Warren also reported that Microsoft would share details about the update at the Mobile World Congress show in February 2013. The Verge cited unnamed sources as providing the information and said the coming update could include features like VPN support, a Wi-Fi connectivity fix, and audio improvements.

VPN support is an interesting one, given Microsoft officials said in June of this year that Microsoft had decided against including VPN functionality in the Windows Phone operating system (even though it had been included in Windows Phone OS' predecessor, Windows Mobile). A Microsoft official told me that Microsoft has decided instead to rely on things like Secure SSL to address this need... as they considered Secure SSL "a better, light-weight approach" to providing this kind of functionality in the new BYOD (bring your own device) world.
I've since heard from a number of business users that no VPN support was a deal breaker for their organizations in adopting Windows Phone. I've also heard from users in countries with governments that censor their citizens' Web-browsing that VPN is a much-desired feature for circumventing officially imposed firewalls.
I asked Microsoft whether the next version of the Windows Phone OS was code-named "Apollo Plus" and whether VPN connectivity will be part of it. Not surprisingly, a spokesperson said only that the company doesn't comment on rumors and speculation.
If Microsoft does refer to the minor, interim update to Windows Phone 8 OS as "Apollo Plus," that might help dampen user expectations a bit. With Tango, many users were expecting a lot more, feature-wise, than ended up being part of that update because it had its own special code name.
Meanwhile, I also asked Microsoft about the whereabouts of the Windows Phone OS 7.8 update -- the one that is slated to allow existing Windows Phone 7 users to make use of resizable tiles on their phones. A Microsoft spokesperson said: "More information on 7.8 will be available in the coming weeks."
As to the rumors circulating that 7.8 might be available this week, I'm doubtful. I think Microsoft might announce the release to manufacturing of 7.8 this week, but I'm hearing the update may not be available from the carriers until early next year (maybe even as late as February 2013)





This story originally posted as "Apollo Plus: Is this Microsoft's first Windows Phone 8 update?" on ZDNet.
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LG Optimus G2 with dual Qore CPU and Android 5.0

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LG Optimus G has just landed to some countries. However, rumors about the successor of the mobile phone was already emerging. A successor is said to have the name of LG Optimus G2. This phone is rumored to have a more advanced specification than the Optimus G.



Mobile is said to be present with Krait-based quad-core processor with a speed of 2GHz or 2.5GHz. In addition, the phone will also be equipped with Adreno 320 GPU, and at least 2 GB of RAM.

Still not enough, LG is also rumored to be pinned full HD 1080p screen on the mobile phone. Moreover, the company is currently based in South Korea is indeed developing a full-screen HD. So it is not surprising that they would use the Optimus G2.

Regarding the operating system, is expected this phone is already using Android OS 5.0 Key Lime Pie. As for the camera, there is a 13 MP camera on the back.


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Saturday, November 24, 2012

iPhone 5 Real Tips and Tricks

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1. how to Opening and closing apps: It is simple enough, but I think many people don't know how to close apps out of the system tray. You should know how to do this every now and then if an app is acting funny or crashing. To open an app, just tap on it. To close an app out of the tray, go to your home screen & double tap the home button and all of your most recently used apps will pop up. then Press and hold any one of the apps until they start wiggling and you can hit the red badges on the apps you want to close.thats only.



2. how to Lock and unlock screen orientation:you want the screen to stay in portrait mode while you're lying down in bed or on the grass at a picnic, simply two tap your home button to bring up the system tray.then Swipe the tray to the left and you will see the orientation lock at the far left. Simply tap it to turn it on or off.


3.How to use Apple Siri: When you need a  help from Apple's digital assistant, you press and hold the home button for a few seconds and you will see Siri's microphone pop up on your screen. Tell to set a calendar event to you or to set an alarm.Siri reserve tables at restaurants or give you movie times and reviews. If you're unsure what you can ask Siri, press the little "i" when the microphone pops up.




4.How to view your notifications, current weather and more: To see that black bar up at the top of your screen? You can touch it and drag it down to view your notifications and all other things. When you are in an app or game where the bar is not visiblevto you, swipe down from the very top of your screen and you will see a tab slide out. Pull that tab down and the notification pane will slide down on your screen.


5.To find apps, contacts, e-mails and many more : When you are on the first page of your iPhone home screen, just swipe to the left and the iPhone 5's universal search bar will appear. Type find what you are looking for there.


6. Shoot photos with your camera, then do a little more with it: Open up the camera app tapping on the camera icon, then press the shutter button or volume up key to snap photos. For more function, Press the Options button and you will see toggle switches for Grid, HDR and a panorama button. You can  flash on and off or set it to auto, or switch to the front-facing camera. The grid comes up to help you compost images and make sure your horizons are straight. HDR makes sure you get details in photos that have very bright and very dark areas . The Panorama button will take you to a new feature in iOS 6 that allows you to take a sweeping photo of a very wide scene. Follow the instructions that pop up on the screen.


7.To set a passcode lock and protect for your phone: Go into Settings>> click General then scroll down to Passcode Lock. Turn it on and select a code that you want. iphones tend to have social networks, e-mail, photos and other sensitive items that we want to keep from prying eyes, so be sure to lock your device for your seaf.


8. How to take a screen shot: See something on your device screen that you want to  keep as a photo? just take a screen shot.  press the power button up top and your home button at the exact same time any time. you are in an application, on the home screen, in a game or everywhere press those two buttons at the same time and a screen shot will be saved into your Photos app.


9. How to save a Web page into your home screen: When you are on the web page you want to access quickly it from your home screen, tap the arrow button on the menu bar at the bottom of the phone screen. The option list come; now select "Add to Home Screen." Now you will have an icon on your home screen that will take you to that Web page.


10.How to insert images to your e-mail: You can when you are composing an e-mail and you decide you want to throw an image into the e-mail body? it is simply go into your photos app then, in the gallery view, click the edit button on the upper right. Select the image or images you want and click copy. Return to your e-mail, After that press and hold in the body where do you want to insert the images, finaly select and "paste."
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Thursday, November 22, 2012

iPhone 5 best

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The good: The iPhone 5 adds everything we wanted in the iPhone 4S: 4G LTE, a longer, larger screen, free turn-by-turn navigation, and a faster A6 processor. Plus, its top-to-bottom redesign is sharp, slim, and feather-light.
The bad: Apple Maps feels unfinished and buggy; Sprint and Verizon models can't use voice and data simultaneously. The smaller connector renders current accessories unusable without an adapter. There's no NFC, and the screen size pales in comparison to jumbo Android models.
The bottom line: The iPhone 5 completely rebuilds the iPhone on a framework of new features and design, addressing its major previous shortcomings. It's absolutely the best iPhone to date, and it easily secures its place in the top tier of the smartphone universe.

The iPhone 5 is the iPhone we've wanted since 2010, adding long-overdue upgrades like a larger screen and faster 4G LTE in a razor-sharp new design. This is the iPhone, rebooted.

The new design is flat-out lovely, both to look at and to hold, and it's hard to find a single part that hasn't been tweaked from the iPhone 4S. The iPhone 5 is at once completely rebuilt and completely familiar.

I've had the chance to use the iPhone 5 for nearly a week, and have been using it for nearly anything I can think of. Is it as futuristic or as exciting as the iPhone 4 or the original iPhone? No. Does this change the smartphone game? No. Other smartphones beat it on features here and there: if you want a larger screen, go with a Samsung Galaxy S3. If you want better battery life, go with a Droid Razr Maxx.

But, if you want a great, all-around, beautifully engineered smartphone that covers all bases, here it is. Just like the MacBook is to the world of laptops, the new iPhone is one of the top three, if not the best-designed, smartphone around. It's better in all the important ways.
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Wednesday, November 21, 2012

galaxy s4

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Fresh rumours have hit the internet suggesting that the Samsung Galaxy S4 will launch with a full HD 1080p display and a powerful quad-core A15 processor.

 These include the suggestion that the Samsung Galaxy S4 will be including a 5-inch (or 4.99-inch, to be precise) Super AMOLED display with a 1080p resolution.

With rival HTC launching its own 1080p smartphone in several countries - the HTC DNA in the US, the HTC J Butterfly in Japan - this seems highly likely to us.

According to a new Korean source, Samsung will be showing its 1080p Super AMOLED displays off at CES in January. And yes, the lack of a + sign at the end of Super AMOLED would suggest that Samsung is sticking with those PenTile displays, but let's not read too much into rumours, eh?

Moving on to those processor rumours, it's being suggested that the Samsung Galaxy S4 will run on a 2GHz quad-core variant of Samsung's own Exynos 5450 CPU.

The Exynos 5450 is built using next generation ARM Coretex-A15 architecture, which provides an estimated 40 per cent power boost over equivalent A9 chips (which is what the Samsung Galaxy S3's processor is built on).

Elsewhere, the rumours suggest that the Samsung Galaxy S4 will be getting a 13-megapixel camera.
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Monday, November 19, 2012

Sony Xperia GX Specs & review

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The Sony Xperia GX is an Android 4.0-based LTE handset with a 13-megapixel camera and is made for release in Japan. It features a 4.6-inch, 720p "Reality Display" utilizing Sony's Mobile Bravia Engine, a dual-core 1.5GHz processor, and 16GB of internal storage.


Besides Xperia Ion targeted for the Japanese market, Sony has introduced two mobile phones, one of which adopt 4G LTE technology in Japan. The phone in question is the Xperia GX. This device runs on the Android 4.0 operating system or the more famous by the name of Ice Cream Sandwich.

And as mentioned about the camera, the Xperia GX offers high resolution 13 MP camera with HD video recording capabilities and LED flash.

Sony Xperia GX

The GX has a display size of 4.6 inch Mobile BRAVIA and dual-core processor 1.5 GHz. For internal storage, 16 GB of space served.

With LTE technology, Sony claims this divice is capable of downloading up to 75Mbps.

Unfortunately, this Smartphone just released in Japan. Sony has not announced pricing, and plans to sell the Xperia GX in other countries.


 Sony Xperia GX full specification look this table :
Overview 2G Network GSM 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900
3G Network  HSDPA
4G Network LTE 2100
SIM Micro-SIM
Announced 2012, May
Status Available. Released 2012, August
Design Dimensions 131 x 69 x 8.6 mm (5.16 x 2.72 x 0.34 in)
Weight 127 g (4.48 oz)
  - Touch-sensitive controls
Display Type LED-backlit LCD, capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Size 720 x 1280 pixels, 4.6 inches (~319 ppi pixel density)
Multitouch Yes, up to 10 fingers
Protection Scratch-resistant glass
- Sony Mobile BRAVIA Engine
- Timescape UI
Ringtones Alert types Vibration; MP3 ringtones
Loudspeaker Yes3.5mm jack Yes
Storage Card slot microSD, up to 32 GB
Internal 16 GB storage, 1GB RAM
Connectivity GPRS Up to 86 kbps
EDGE Up to 237 kbps
Speed HSDPA, 14.4 Mbps; HSUPA, 5.76 Mbps; LTE, 25 Mbps UL, 75 Mbps DL
WLAN Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct, DLNA, Wi-Fi hotspot
Bluetooth Yes, v3.1 with A2DP
USB Yes, microUSB (MHL) v2.0
Camera Primary 13 MP, autofocus, LED flash
Features Geo-tagging, touch focus, face and smile detection, 3D sweep panorama, image stabilization
Video Yes, 1080p@30fps, continuous autofocus, video light, video stabilizer
Secondary Yes, 1.3 MP, 720p@30fps
Platform OS Android OS, v4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich)
Chipset Qualcomm MSM8960 Snapdragon
CPU Dual-core 1.5 GHz Krait
GPU Adreno 225
Features Sensors Accelerometer, gyro, proximity, compass
Messaging SMS (threaded view), MMS, Email, IM, Push Email
Browser HTML5, Adobe Flash
Radio No
GPS Yes, with A-GPS support
Java Yes, via Java MIDP emulator
Colors Black, White
- SNS integration
- TV-out (via MHL A/V link)
- Active noise cancellation with dedicated mic
- MP4/H.263/H.264/WMV player
- MP3/eAAC+/WMA/WAV player
- TrackID music recognition
- Google Search, Maps, Gmail,
YouTube, Calendar, Google Talk
- Document viewer
- Voice memo/dial/commands
- Predictive text input
Battery Standard battery, Li-Ion 1700 mAh
Stand-by Up to 300 h (2G) / Up to 380 h (3G)
Talk time Up to 6 h 40 min (2G) / Up to 6 h 40 min (3G)

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Google Nexus 4 Review

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Introduction:

Google's Nexus smartphones have always set the standard when it comes to a pure Google experience.
The first Nexus One was a true geek device. Sold only through Google directly , it never achieved massive sales. But it gave the world the true raw power of Android without the bloatware of other variants. As of January 2010, the ball was well and truly rolling.

Moving steadily along with momentum on its side, Korean-based manufacturer LG is seeing itself in a very unfamiliar position in the smartphone industry. For a change, the spotlight has been directed at them of late – thanks primarily to the recent launch of its flagship device in the LG Optimus G. And with that going for them, it surely surprised many when the first rumors started coming around hinting to the notion that they would be the one to actually produce the next Google Nexus device.

Without question, it’s a prized opportunity to be the one chosen by Google to come up with the next Nexus smartphone, since as we know all too well, they’re highly prized items sporting the latest and greatest with Android. Oppositely, for the Mountain View based company, they’re also shifting into top gear by bringing the heat to the competition this holiday season. Combining the two’s efforts, they’ve collaborated in producing the Google Nexus 4 – the fourth generations Nexus smartphone.

Already in the last couple of months, we’ve seen some fantastic smartphones come to market – with each one seemingly raising the bar. In a time when we’re presented with renowned devices such as the iPhone 5, Samsung Galaxy Note II, Nokia Lumia 920, HTC DROID DNA, and even the LG Optimus G, one can only imagine the kind of star power needed by the Google Nexus 4 to stand apart from all the rest. Well, seeing that we’re given the latest flavor of Jelly Bean, combined with one unimaginable price point, it seems as though the Nexus 4 has all the correct ingredients to make a meaningful, yet highly prized smartphone in this cutthroat business.

The package contains:


microUSB cable
Wall charger
Quick Start Guide
Safety & Warranty Guide
Terms & Conditions, Return Policy, and Limited Warranty Guide

Design:


Arguably, the last two Nexus smartphones put out by Samsung haven’t been cutting-edge per se in the design department, but thankfully enough, LG manages to bring back a small sprinkling of premium to the beloved line. But to tell you the truth, the overall design of the Nexus 4 still doesn’t match the precision and attention to detail seen with the original Nexus One. From the front, its minimalistic and clean surface stands out most prominently, but as a whole, it looks very much like the Galaxy Nexus from last year. However, it’s in the rear that we’re most impressed with the handset, since it’s employing a cool looking pattern design very similar to what’s seen over with the “Crystal Reflection” rear casing of the Optimus G. Depending on the angle, it sparkles brilliantly with its alternating dotted patterns. Even better, the glass casing layered on top of it adds that desired level of premium to its entire construction.
Strangely though, the Nexus 4 comes of being super slippery in the hand – attributed to the handset’s front and rear surfaces being covered in glass. In fact, it’s so very slippery that when we place it on a surface with a slight incline, it begins to slowly slide down, and in many instances, we’re always left to remind ourselves to keep an eye on it. Additionally, it’s a magnet for all the nasty baddies out there that dirty up its beauty – like fingerprints and smudges. With the help of a cloth, though, they’re relatively gone in one quick wipe, thus, bringing it back to its pristine appearance. Compared to other recent handsets, the Nexus 4 doesn’t attempt to push its construction to the limits, which is evident by its 0.36-inch thick profile and 4.9 oz weight – making it still somewhat unwieldy to hold in the hand. Ultimately, if it weren’t for the glass casing and enchanting pattern design of the rear, this would’ve been a blandAttached with the Nexus moniker, it doesn’t surprise us there are no capacitive buttons below the screen on this beauty, but rather, its LED pulse notification light is positioned there instead. On the opposite edge, we greeted with the usual suspect of characters – these include its earpiece, light & proximity sensors, and front-facing 1.3-megapixel camera, the latter of which can shoot video in 720p. looking handset
Checking out the items littered along its trim, which is sporting a matte soft touch coating, we find its volume control on the left edge and power button on the right. Raised slightly above the surface, they’re distinctive enough to feel out with our fingers, but even better, they exhibit good feedback when pressed.

Along the top trim, there’s the 3.5mm headset jack and noise-cancelling microphone – while on the bottom, we’re left with only the standard mic and microUSB port for charging/data/video-out connectivity. Somewhat of a bummer, the Nexus 4 forgoes using a more favorable MHL port for video-out functionality, and instead, it relies on a Slimport socket, which means you’ll need to purchase yet another proprietary adapter in order to connect it to a high-def TV. Additionally, it boasts wireless video-out functionality too, but you’ll need to have equipment that’s compatible with Miracast’s wireless display standard – again, it’s a complex process, sadly.
Flush to the glass surface of the rear, the Nexus 4 is sporting an 8-megapixel auto-focus camera with LED flash, which is capable of shooting 1080p videos. And finally, the narrow speaker grill is located towards the bottom right of the rear casing. Seeing that it’s sporting a closed design, there’s no easy access to its internal 2,100 mAh battery.


Display:


Having seen the razor sharp and awe-inspiring 1080p display of the HTC DROID DNA, there isn’t much wow factor seen with the Nexus 4’s display anymore. To tell you the truth, though, it’s the same one used by the LG Optimus G – so it’s been done before already! Regardless of that, there are some noteworthy elements seen with its 4.7-inch WXGA 768 x 1280 True HD IPS Plus display.


For starters, it’s still one detailed thing with its above average pixel density of 318 ppi – and that’s despite being outdone by the DROID DNA. Secondly, since it’s relying on good old IPS LCD technology, it delivers colors that are the most natural in tone, giving it a distinctive realistic appearance over the saturated tones put out by the rival AMOLED technology. And finally, it works rather well when it matters the most with outdoor visibility, which is attributed to its strong brightness output, decent reflection rate and wide viewing angles.

Protecting everything, its screen is soundly reinforced with Gorilla Glass 2, which is rounded around the trim to seamlessly transition and mix well with its sides. Just like on the Optimus G, it’s utilizing Zerogap technology that simply combines the LCD panel with the glass and eliminates the air gap usually found there, to make it appear closer to the surface. All in all, it’s sharp looking no doubt, but as we’ve made it transparent, it’s nothing that’s ground-breaking.

Camara

The Nexus 4 comes with two cameras – an 8MP job around the back and a 1.3MP snapper on the front.
8MP seems to be the industry standard at the moment – but as we're constantly reminded, it's not about the megapixels but so much more. Elements including the aperture, the compression and all that stuff have a part to play. Brains vs brawn and so on.

Battery life


This is where we'd normally moan about the fact that the power pack is sealed into the unit. It's becoming more and more popular for handset manufacturers to do this.Normally, we're told it is to keep the size down and the aesthetics to a high standard. But the result is always the same: looks nice, but battery is rubbish.
Gladly, we can say that's not the case with the Nexus 4. Of course, individual usage will vary wildly, but we found it to put in a competent enough performance.
We took our review unit off charge at 7am. We did the obligatory check of emails, tweets, facebook messages and SMS.
Over the course of the day, we made just under half an hour's worth of calls, browsed the web for about 40 mins between 3G and Wi-Fi, checked Twitter and Facebook half a dozen times each, took 10 photos and three videos and listened to music for about half an hour.
By the time we got home at 5pm, the Nexus 4 had told us the charge was hitting 15% but then we managed to keep it going with minimal use until we went to bed at 9pm.
We must also point out that much of the day was spent in a basement office with poor signal, so the Nexus 4 was constantly searching.
We'd call that a good result and with frugal use, you'll squeeze at least another few hours out of this. For a modern handset, it's impressive and we are really pleased.
It's most definitely an improvement on the HTC One X and even trumps the Samsung Galaxy S3 which is, itself, no slouch in that department. The thing is that it is so dependent on what Android apps you have installed and what they're doing in the background.
It's even more of a bonus because despite Jelly Bean having brought performance enhancements, one thing that has degraded is battery life.
We've heard nothing but complaints from people who've upgraded from Ice Cream Sandwich that ICS was better. Turning off Google Now appears to make a difference, but only a minor one.
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Sunday, November 18, 2012

Sony Xperia U advantages and disadvantares

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You know the Sony Xperia U right? Xperia U is one of the first smartphone to be launched by Sony after the official split with Ericsson a few months ago. Previously Sony has also released Xperia S for the premium consumers and Xperia P to middle class consumers, and the Xperia U is intended for lower-class segment.

Sony Xperia U is a mobile phone with dual core processor and comes with Android OS 2.3 Gingerbread although the later can be upgraded to a higher version of the Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich shortly after that. U Xperia equip himself with a 5 megapixel camera and comes with lots of other supporting features such as autofocus and LED flash.

And the following key features or advantages in the Xperia U:

Quad-band GSM /GPRS/EDGE support
3.5" 16M-color capacitive touchscreen of Full WVGA resolution (854 x 480 pixels) with Sony Mobile BRAVIA engine
Android OS v2.3.7 Gingerbread, planned Android 4.0 ICS update
Dual-core 1 GHz Cortex-A9 CPU, 512 MB RAM, NovaThor U8500 chipset
5 MP autofocus camera with LED flash and geotagging, Multi Angle shot
720p video recording @ 30fps with continuous autofocus and stereo sound
Wi-Fi b/g/n and DLNA
GPS with A-GPS
8 GB built-in storage (6 GB user-accessible)
microUSB port (charging) and stereo Bluetooth v2.1
Standard 3.5 mm audio jack
Stereo FM radio with RDS
Voice dialing
Adobe Flash 11 support
Deep Facebook integration
Accelerometer and proximity sensor
Transparent stripe changes color depending on screen content
Replaceable cap at the bottom allows easy customization

While the disadvantages of Xperia U include:
Limited storage with no expansion options
No Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich out of box
Some competitors are slimmer

Well, the article about the advantages and disadvantages of the Sony Xperia U for you all. if unclear please speak up via comments below.



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Saturday, November 17, 2012

LG Optimus G for AT&T and Sprint review

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Introduction

With the dust barely settled after the Korean LG Optimus G's run around out review track, we have its LTE packing, US siblings on our hands. The LG Optimus G E970 for AT&T and its LS970 relative for Sprint are the two versions which are offered across the Atlantic. Thankfully, the wait for their arrival wasn't long at all - LG pulled off a launch which looked a lot like what Samsung did with the Galaxy SIII earlier this year.


The LG Optimus G E970 and its LS970 relative are slightly different characters. The AT&T version comes with an 8MP camera and a microSD card slot. The Sprint-flavored Optimus G on the other hand, is practically identical to the Korean version, which we have reviewed already. This means that users will enjoy a larger, 13MP camera sensor, but will have to settle for 32GB on non-expandable memory.
Most importantly however, both smartphones come with the headline grabbing Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro chipset and two gigs of RAM, which means that, regardless which one they pick, potential users will get to enjoy the most powerful Android hardware around.
Here goes the full list of talents which the US LG Optimus G duo has to offer.

Key features

Quad-band GSM/GPRS/EDGE support
3G with HSPA; LTE
CDMA network support (Sprint Wireless version only)
4.7" 16M-color WXGA True HD IPS Plus (768 x 1280 pixels) capacitive touchscreen, Gorilla Glass
Android OS v4.0.4 Ice Cream Sandwich, planned upgrade to 4.1 Jelly Bean, LG Optimus UI 3.0
Quad-core 1.5 GHz Krait CPU, 2 GB RAM, Adreno 320 GPU, Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro chipset
13 MP autofocus camera with LED flash and geotagging, image stabilization, Time catch shot, smart shutter (Sprint version)
8 MP autofocus camera with LED (AT&T version)
1080p video recording @ 30fps with continuous autofocus and stereo sound
1.3 MP front-facing camera, 720p video recording
Wi-Fi a/b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct and DLNA
GPS with A-GPS, GLONASS
32GB of built-in storage (Sprint version)
16GB of built-in storage; microSD card slot with 16GB card preinstalled (AT&T version)
MHL-enabled microUSB port, USB host support
Bluetooth v4.0
Standard 3.5 mm audio jack
Voice dialing
Two app overlay mode for multi-tasking (Q Slide)
Independent multimedia content output through MHL (Dual Screen Dual Play)
Accelerometer and proximity sensor
Active noise cancellation with dedicated mic

Main disadvantages

No microSD card slot on the Sprint version
No Jelly Bean at launch
Screens have mediocre sunlight legibility
Non user-replaceable battery
There is hardly a box left unchecked by the LG Optimus G duo. Both devices offer impressive hardware and gorgeous screens. Even the software is a massive improvement over LG smartphones of old.
Of course, the long list of features can do anything for a smartphone but guarantee its success. This is particularly the case in the US market, where the LG Optimus G has to face incredibly stiff competition.


We are going to kick the review off with a quick unboxing, followed by a design and build quality inspection of both the LG Optimus G for AT&T and Sprint Wireless. The dedicated camera section on the other hand, will closely examine and compare LG's 13MP and 8MP camera sensors' performance.
Editorial: You might notice that this review is shorter than usual and doesn't include all of our proprietary tests. The reason is it has been prepared and written far away from our office and test lab. The LG Optimus G for AT&T and Sprint are US-only phones, so they will probably never get to the shores of the Old Continent. Still, we think we've captured the essence of the phones in the same precise, informative and detailed way that's become our trademark. Enjoy the good read!


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Bluetooth Headset That you can Wear on Your Finger

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With a simple twist, The O.R.B. transforms from a ring to a headset worn on the ear that is capable of hands-free calling. Incorporating HiWave™ technology, the O.R.B. is a “Digitset™” that provides high-quality bone conduction audio without the discomfort of placing a device inside the ear. A deluxe edition also features an E Ink display for caller ID, text messaging, and calendar reminders.

To use the ring as a headset, simply remove it from the finger and twist open around the hinged joint. The ring (now a headset) is placed over the upper ear, between the ear and the side of the head. The transmitter end of the headset rests just above the jawbone and utilizes dual speaker “voice annihilation” DSP technology. The transmit exciter transducer rests just behind the outer ear.


The O.R.B. will be available in a variety of sizes, available in styles for both men and women.

All sizes have an expansion hinge, spring prongs and adjustable adhesive soft pads on the interior edge, which provide a secure and comfortable fit on the finger (or thumb) as well as the ear.


The O.R.B. features military-grade seals and gaskets, making it fully waterproof and built to accompany you on any adventure.


The ring vibrates, alerting the user to an incoming call, text message, or event reminder. The user can glance down at the finger and see a horizontal streaming message of caller I.D. or meeting schedules. If accepting an incoming call, the user twists open the O.R.B., slips over the ear, and begins the conversation. If declining incoming calls or texts, or dismissing event reminders, the user can simply push the cancel button with the O.R.B. still idle on their finger. When not in use the ring serves as a time device/alarm clock. If the user would like to silence a call he/she can simply touch a button on the band.



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