Tuesday, December 4, 2012

LG Optimus 4X HD review

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LG’s Optimus 4X HD is the company’s new flagship handset, and it’s certainly not messing around with the specifications. There’s a 4.7in 1,280x720 IPS screen, an Nvidia Tegra 3 chipset with a 1.5GHz quad-core processor and an eight-megapixel camera with a backlit sensor. This puts it up against top-of-the-range phones – such as the HTC One X and award-winning Samsung Galaxy S3.

The 4X HD doesn’t look as fancy as the One X and S3; instead of a curved screen and rounded pebble shape you get a more standard rounded rectangle. It’s easy to maintain a solid hold on the phone thanks to a textured back, and two parallel chromed plastic ridges around the edge provide grip for your thumb and fingers. The outside of the phone is sparse, with just a power button, volume rocker, headphone jack and Micro USB port; you don’t get a dedicated camera button, and have to pop the back cover off to get at the microSD card slot.
The 4.7in screen takes up most of the front of the phone, and it’s an impressive display. There’s no AMOLED display, as on the Galaxy S3, but it is a superior IPS-type LCD. There’s slightly less contrast than on the Galaxy S3, but the operating system, photos and videos still look great; the screen is definitely a match for the IPS model on the HTC One X. The 1,280x720 resolution is the same as that of the One X and Galaxy S3, and gives a pixel density of 313 pixels-per-inch – comparable to the 312 of the One X and 306 of the Galaxy S3. You can’t see the pixels, at any rate, and we can’t imagine anyone having any complaints about the display.
LG has heavily customised the handset’s Android 4.0 operating system. Many of the icons are LG’s own, and they’re big, bright and colourful, and work well with the large, high-resolution screen. Like stock Android 4.0, the main app screen is divided into Apps and Widgets, but the 4X HD also gives you a separate section for the apps you have downloaded.

There are some useful preinstalled apps. LG’s own video player has a preview which lets you scan through videos with a picture-in-picture box without leaving your current place. You can also pinch-to-zoom and pan around while a video is playing. The SmartShare DLNA app lets you play back media files stored on DLNA servers, and also control playback on other DLNA devices from the phone. The only app we didn’t get on with was LG’s own email app; it wouldn’t let us connect to our company Exchange server due to a problem with SSL certificates – most Android email apps have the option to accept all SSL certificates, so getting around our Exchange server’s quirks, but this is absent from LG’s app.


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Wednesday, November 28, 2012

LG Optimus G2 with dual Qore CPU and Android 5.0

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LG Optimus G has just landed to some countries. However, rumors about the successor of the mobile phone was already emerging. A successor is said to have the name of LG Optimus G2. This phone is rumored to have a more advanced specification than the Optimus G.



Mobile is said to be present with Krait-based quad-core processor with a speed of 2GHz or 2.5GHz. In addition, the phone will also be equipped with Adreno 320 GPU, and at least 2 GB of RAM.

Still not enough, LG is also rumored to be pinned full HD 1080p screen on the mobile phone. Moreover, the company is currently based in South Korea is indeed developing a full-screen HD. So it is not surprising that they would use the Optimus G2.

Regarding the operating system, is expected this phone is already using Android OS 5.0 Key Lime Pie. As for the camera, there is a 13 MP camera on the back.


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Saturday, November 17, 2012

LG Optimus G for AT&T and Sprint review

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Introduction

With the dust barely settled after the Korean LG Optimus G's run around out review track, we have its LTE packing, US siblings on our hands. The LG Optimus G E970 for AT&T and its LS970 relative for Sprint are the two versions which are offered across the Atlantic. Thankfully, the wait for their arrival wasn't long at all - LG pulled off a launch which looked a lot like what Samsung did with the Galaxy SIII earlier this year.


The LG Optimus G E970 and its LS970 relative are slightly different characters. The AT&T version comes with an 8MP camera and a microSD card slot. The Sprint-flavored Optimus G on the other hand, is practically identical to the Korean version, which we have reviewed already. This means that users will enjoy a larger, 13MP camera sensor, but will have to settle for 32GB on non-expandable memory.
Most importantly however, both smartphones come with the headline grabbing Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro chipset and two gigs of RAM, which means that, regardless which one they pick, potential users will get to enjoy the most powerful Android hardware around.
Here goes the full list of talents which the US LG Optimus G duo has to offer.

Key features

Quad-band GSM/GPRS/EDGE support
3G with HSPA; LTE
CDMA network support (Sprint Wireless version only)
4.7" 16M-color WXGA True HD IPS Plus (768 x 1280 pixels) capacitive touchscreen, Gorilla Glass
Android OS v4.0.4 Ice Cream Sandwich, planned upgrade to 4.1 Jelly Bean, LG Optimus UI 3.0
Quad-core 1.5 GHz Krait CPU, 2 GB RAM, Adreno 320 GPU, Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro chipset
13 MP autofocus camera with LED flash and geotagging, image stabilization, Time catch shot, smart shutter (Sprint version)
8 MP autofocus camera with LED (AT&T version)
1080p video recording @ 30fps with continuous autofocus and stereo sound
1.3 MP front-facing camera, 720p video recording
Wi-Fi a/b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct and DLNA
GPS with A-GPS, GLONASS
32GB of built-in storage (Sprint version)
16GB of built-in storage; microSD card slot with 16GB card preinstalled (AT&T version)
MHL-enabled microUSB port, USB host support
Bluetooth v4.0
Standard 3.5 mm audio jack
Voice dialing
Two app overlay mode for multi-tasking (Q Slide)
Independent multimedia content output through MHL (Dual Screen Dual Play)
Accelerometer and proximity sensor
Active noise cancellation with dedicated mic

Main disadvantages

No microSD card slot on the Sprint version
No Jelly Bean at launch
Screens have mediocre sunlight legibility
Non user-replaceable battery
There is hardly a box left unchecked by the LG Optimus G duo. Both devices offer impressive hardware and gorgeous screens. Even the software is a massive improvement over LG smartphones of old.
Of course, the long list of features can do anything for a smartphone but guarantee its success. This is particularly the case in the US market, where the LG Optimus G has to face incredibly stiff competition.


We are going to kick the review off with a quick unboxing, followed by a design and build quality inspection of both the LG Optimus G for AT&T and Sprint Wireless. The dedicated camera section on the other hand, will closely examine and compare LG's 13MP and 8MP camera sensors' performance.
Editorial: You might notice that this review is shorter than usual and doesn't include all of our proprietary tests. The reason is it has been prepared and written far away from our office and test lab. The LG Optimus G for AT&T and Sprint are US-only phones, so they will probably never get to the shores of the Old Continent. Still, we think we've captured the essence of the phones in the same precise, informative and detailed way that's become our trademark. Enjoy the good read!


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Bluetooth Headset That you can Wear on Your Finger

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With a simple twist, The O.R.B. transforms from a ring to a headset worn on the ear that is capable of hands-free calling. Incorporating HiWave™ technology, the O.R.B. is a “Digitset™” that provides high-quality bone conduction audio without the discomfort of placing a device inside the ear. A deluxe edition also features an E Ink display for caller ID, text messaging, and calendar reminders.

To use the ring as a headset, simply remove it from the finger and twist open around the hinged joint. The ring (now a headset) is placed over the upper ear, between the ear and the side of the head. The transmitter end of the headset rests just above the jawbone and utilizes dual speaker “voice annihilation” DSP technology. The transmit exciter transducer rests just behind the outer ear.


The O.R.B. will be available in a variety of sizes, available in styles for both men and women.

All sizes have an expansion hinge, spring prongs and adjustable adhesive soft pads on the interior edge, which provide a secure and comfortable fit on the finger (or thumb) as well as the ear.


The O.R.B. features military-grade seals and gaskets, making it fully waterproof and built to accompany you on any adventure.


The ring vibrates, alerting the user to an incoming call, text message, or event reminder. The user can glance down at the finger and see a horizontal streaming message of caller I.D. or meeting schedules. If accepting an incoming call, the user twists open the O.R.B., slips over the ear, and begins the conversation. If declining incoming calls or texts, or dismissing event reminders, the user can simply push the cancel button with the O.R.B. still idle on their finger. When not in use the ring serves as a time device/alarm clock. If the user would like to silence a call he/she can simply touch a button on the band.



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Monday, November 12, 2012

Holiday gift guide 2012 – smartphones and tablets

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With the summer over, and the fall in full swing, it’s about time to start thinking about those Holiday season presents. Sure, it might be a bit in advance, but if you are in store for the latest and greatest technology as a gift, research would definitely help.

Luckily, this Holiday, you won’t have a shortage of options to choose from. If you are ready to become the geeky Santa Claus with gadgets in your gift bag, the good news is that this time there will be worthy smartphones on all three biggest platforms: iOS, Android and Windows Phone.

While in 2011 we still didn’t have a completely mature smartphone ecosystem and we could still see flaws. Now, in 2012, we finally got rid of lag on Android, Microsoft polished Windows Phone 8, and the iPhone got even better. Android has almost closed the app gap with the App Store, and Windows Phone is starting to catch up too.

But what you should really care about is the all-around products, devices that are both aesthetically pleasing and crazy fast. We’ve picked out the best for the U.S. carriers and international in the slideshows below.



Source:www.phonearena.com
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Saturday, October 27, 2012

New Nexus Phone vs. iPhone 5

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It has become clear that, at the very least, LG will be releasing a new Nexus phone this year to compete not only with other Android devices but with Apple’s new iPhone as well. Dubbed the LG Nexus 4, at least for now, the device marries some pretty hefty specifications with the benefits that only a Nexus device can offer. But how does it stack up against the iPhone 5? Let’s take a look.

While Apple’s yearly smartphone, the iPhone 5, is already in the hands of consumers, Google has yet to release its yearly smartphone which arrives with the Nexus moniker. In the past, Google has turned to companies like HTC and Samsung to build its Nexus-branded smartphone. However, this year, it looks like LG is tasked with developing the device.



The LG-made Nexus still isn’t official yet but numerous leaks have not only pinpointed its specifications, but they have also revealed the phone for the entire world to see ahead of its presumed launch date. The LG Nexus 4, as it may be called, is presumably going to be announced by Andy Rubin on stage at the All Things D Dive Into Mobile conference on October 29th.

And it is there that Google will reveal its latest iPhone 5 competitor. That being said, here is how the rumored LG Nexus 4 matches up with Apple’s latest-generation smartphone, the iPhone 5.

Release Date
On September 21st, Apple released the iPhone 5 in the United States and several other regions. The device is still making its rounds and if it’s not available in your country just yet, it should be in the coming weeks and months. Apple plans to release the iPhone 5 in over 100 countries by the end of 2012 and we expect that it will tack on some more in 2013 as well.

Even though it was released in September doesn't mean it’s easy to find though. Apple’s online stores and retail stores are back-ordered and AT&T, Sprint and Verizon, the three major carriers in the U.S.

As for the new Nexus phone release date, we still don’t have one. It’s possible, and we’ve heard this might be the case, that the release date for the Google Play Store will be on October 29th, though it would be the first same-day release since the original Nexus One.

French publication Le Figaro also claims that the new Nexus will hit French carrier SFR by the end of December which means that CDMA carriers like Sprint and Verizon could also get the new Nexus around that time as well.

Display

With the iPhone 5, Apple for the first time increased the size of the iPhone 5′s screen. The iPhone 5 boasts a 4-inch display, up from the 3.5-inch displays that populated the earlier iPhone models. In addition, Apple included a 16:9 aspect ratio which means that the iPhone now can play widescreen content. This makes watching movies a pleasure on the new iPhone 5′s display.


The iPhone 5 uses a Retina Display with a 1136 x 640 resolution which is not full HD resolution. However, it also offers 326 pixels-per-inch which means it brings extremely clear on-screen text because users cannot see individual pixels.

As for the screen on the LG Nexus 4, it’s expected to be 4.7-inches in size with a 1280×768 resolution. That means that it will be full on HD. Rumors state that the display might have a 320ppi which could mean that the display on this new Nexus phone could be on par with Apple’s Retina Display on the iPhone 5. We imagine that it will have something similar to a 16:9 aspect ratio as well which means that it too will be able to play widescreen content.What this means is that the biggest difference is going to be the size. Those who want a large screen may want to take a closer look at the LG Nexus 4 while those who aren’t in need of a massive display, may opt to look closely at the iPhone 5.

Design

The iPhone 4 and the iPhone 4S shared similar designs. However, with the iPhone 5, Apple got rid of the glass back and replaced it with a sleek new industrial design that features a two-toned back with the largest piece composed of anodized aluminum. Around the edges of the iPhone 5 there is a band of metal which is both easy to grip and adds to the beauty of the phone.

The iPhone 5 is also both lighter and slimmer than the iPhone 4S. It weighs 112 grams as opposed to the 140 gram weight of the iPhone 4S and the difference is noticeable right off the bat. In fact, some users have complained about the phone being too light. If that can actually be chalked up as a complaint. And while the iPhone 4S was 9.3mm thin, the iPhone 5 is 7.6mm thin.



This is an area where the LG Nexus 4 may not match up well with the iPhone 5. From the photos, it appears that the device matches up quite nicely with the previous Nexus, the Galaxy Nexus. We see a shell that features rounded corners and a lot of black. And because of its screen, it also appears to have a massive footprint.

A 3D image of the new Nexus phone make it appear fairly slender but how slender or how heavy are two features that remain unclear at this point.




What is clear is that the device will again be made with the familiar plastic, a material that accompanies many Android phones and was the material used with the Galaxy Nexus. For many, this won’t be a problem, especially if it keeps the cost down, but for those that were hoping the Nexus 4 would win a design award, it’s looking like that won’t be the case.

Specs

Apple made numerous improvements with the iPhone 5 hardware. Here is a complete run down of the iPhone 5′s specifications.

Apple A6 Dual Core Processor
1GB RAM
16GB/32GB /64GB models
4-inch Retina Display 1136 x 640
Rear – 8-megapixel iSight camera
Front - FaceTime HD camera with 1.2MP photos and HD video (720p)
Bluetooth v 4.0
USB Host unofficially supported
802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi  - 802.11n 2.4GHz and 5GHz
In comparison, here is a spec list for the new LG Nexus 4:

Quad-Core ARMv7 1.5GHz
2GB RAM
Memory: 8GB (No microSD card slot)
4.7-inch Display 1280×768
Rear – 8-megapixel camera
Front-facing camera
We assume the new Nexus will have all of the other bells and whistles of a major Android smartphone as well including Bluetooth support. One thing to note is that the Nexus seems to only have a 8GB version though we imagine there likely will be either a 16GB or 32GB option available at launch as well.

Camera

Apple upgraded the rear camera on the iPhone 5. The new iSight camera delivers a fast shutter speed, panorama mode, and is still at the top of the smartphone pile when it comes to quality of photos. A photo taken with the iPhone 5′s camera can be seen below.



In addition, Apple included a new HD FaceTime camera on the front of the iPhone 5 which means video chatting inside and outside will be much more crisp than it was with the iPhone 4S.

Google’s new Nexus phone will apparently sport a 8MP camera like its predecessor and it too will likely be backed up by a host of software functions found within Android already. The ability to take panoramic photos is included.

Nexus phones have never been known for their cameras though and there is no reason to suspect that Google and LG will outdo the iPhone 5 with the camera on the Nexus 4. Below is a photo sample taken with the Nexus 4 and while it might be better than the average photos taken with the Galaxy Nexus’ camera, it doesn't appear to be any better than photos taken with the iPhone 5.



Software

Apple’s iPhone 5 runs the company’s new iOS 6 operating system which brings 200 new features over iOS 5. Key additions include Apple’s new Maps application which has replaced Google Maps as the native Maps application. Thus far, the service has received tons of complaints but a Google Maps iOS app is in the works and iPhone 5 users can still access the Google Maps web app if need be.



Source : http://www.gottabemobile.com/2012/10/11/new-nexus-phone-vs-iphone-5/



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Wednesday, October 24, 2012

LG Optimus G

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Design, Call Quality, and Network

The Optimus G on AT&T looks a lot like it does on Sprint, which is a good thing. LG created the gorgeous Prada phone, so it's no surprise that the Optimus G is quite a looker. Made of high-quality plastic on the sides, with glass panels on the front and back, the phone has a vaguely incandescent pattern on the back that looks different depending on the angle you view it from. I miss the silver accent ring wrapped around the middle of the Sprint version, but the phone still pulls off simple-chic very well. Next to the Apple iPhone 5, this is easily the nicest-looking phone we've seen. And at 5.12 by 2.82 by 0.33 inches and 5.19 ounces, it's a reasonable size given its large 4.7-inch display.


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That 4.7-inch HD IPS Plus LCD is pretty awesome. It features 1280-by-720-pixel resolution, which works out to a crisp 312 pixels per inch. And unlike the Samsung Galaxy S III $179.99 at Amazon Wireless, this phone doesn't use a PenTile pixel layout, so it looks even sharper. That big screen is ideal for watching video, playing games, and taking photos. It also means you get a sprawling keyboard for typing; I actually had to stretch my entire thumb across the screen in order to hit every letter. It's a little big and unwieldy, but so are all phones with a screen this size.

One big problem: I did most of my testing with the screen brightness set to maximum. I noticed it dip considerably after about 10 or 15 minutes of benchmarking. When I checked on it in the phone's Settings, I saw the brightness level had dropped down to 66 percent. I tried to turn it back up, and got the message, "Unable to brighten more due to high temperature. Try again later." This happened on multiple occasions. Especially when using processor-intensive applications like games, the top half of the phone became increasingly warm. LG claims it has not encountered this problem, but this device, along with two test units on Sprint all showed the same behavior in our tests.

Three function keys beneath the display light up when the screen is on, otherwise the front of the phone is completely black. There's a 3.5mm headphone jack on the top, a cool glowing power button on the right, a volume rocker on the left, and a charging port on the bottom. There's also a microSD port on the left side of this phone, a welcome addition that's missing in the Sprint version.

The Optimus G supports AT&T's 4G LTE network, as well as HSPA+ 21. AT&T scored high in our Fastest Mobile Networks tests earlier this year, especially for its LTE network. Speeds in New York City were incredible. I saw an average of 33Mbps down and 12Mbps up, along with a high of 44Mbps down, which is about double the speed I get on my home internet connection.

Reception was solid, and call quality was good overall. Voices are a little muddy in the phone's earpiece, with some audible fuzz in the background. But calls made sounded clear and natural, with good background noise cancellation. The speakerphone sounds harsh, but is loud enough to use outdoors. The phone paired easily with my Jawbone Era Bluetooth headset. LG's Voice Command app was extremely finicky, and I had to repeat a number of commands over and over again.

The Optimus G uses Bluetooth 4.0, which allows various smart watches and fitness devices to communicate with the phone. It also supports 802.11 a/b/g/n Wi-Fi on the 2.4 and 5GHz bands. The nonremovable 2100mAh battery was good for an excellent 13 hours and 37 minutes of 3G talk time.


Android and Apps

The Optimus G is the first U.S. phone powered by Qualcomm's 1.5GHz quad-core Snapdragon S4 Pro APQ8064 processor. Samsung's upcoming Galaxy Note II will be packing a 1.6GHz quad-core Exynos 4412, but performance there remains to be seen. As it stands, this is the fastest Android phone we've tested—even faster than the Sprint version. According to our benchmarks, performance can sometimes be almost double that of phones like the Galaxy S III. It's actually closer to results we've seen on top Android tablets, especially for gaming. Internet performance is solid, on par with the Editors' Choice Galaxy S III.

The Optimus G ships with Android 4.0.4 "Ice Cream Sandwich," which LG pledges to update to Android 4.1 "Jelly Bean" within the coming months. Although Ice Cream Sandwich lacks Google's Project Butter, which smooths out the Android experience, the quad-core processor still makes everything feel fast.

Camera, Multimedia, and Conclusions

Whereas Sprint's model boasts a 13-megapixel camera, the AT&T Optimus G has a more standard 8-megapixel shooter. That's not a huge deal, because as we saw with the Sprint phone, those extra megapixels don't compensate for a sensor that's merely average. Fortunately, the camera doesn't fare much worse here.

Compared with the Sprint model, this camera captures less detail. Still, our tests confirmed that even the Sprint phone was still a long way off from capturing a truly sharp image. In the realm of phone cameras, this one falls somewhere in the middle. Compared with the iPhone 5 and the Galaxy S III, images taken with the Optimus G look a little washed out, and details aren't as fine. They're still good enough for Facebook, but they're nothing to write home about. The camera records fine 1080p video at 30 frames per second both indoors and out. There's also a 1.3-megapixel, 720p front-facing camera for video chats.

You also get some fun features, like LG's silly-sounding Cheese Shutter, which triggers the camera to snap a photo when you say "cheese." It's great for setting the phone up on a tripod to take a group shot, but be warned that it may also go off when you say "knees" or "please."

The Optimus G's beautiful display makes it a good device for media playback. It comes with 11.08GB of internal storage, along with a side-mounted microSD slot, which worked with out 64GB SanDisk card. I was able to play all of our music test files except for FLAC, and all of our test videos up to 1080p. Audio was great through wired earbuds, though for video it was slightly out of sync while using Altec Lansing Backbeat Bluetooth headphones.

The LG Optimus G is the fastest phone on AT&T, but an average camera and overheating issues keep it from being the best. If you're a speed freak who can look past those issues, the Optimus G will make you very happy. There aren't enough differences between this phone and Sprint model to justify switching carriers. And if you aren't already committed to a carrier, I'd say to choose one based on carrier performance where you live rather than on the phone.

Otherwise, the Samsung Galaxy S III offers you excellent (though slightly less) performance, a microSD card slot, and even better call quality. Or, if you're willing to look past Android, the Apple iPhone 5 is also fast and elegant, with an unsurpassed app ecosystem.

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