Friday, November 30, 2012

Nexus 4 wireless charging

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One of the more notable features that happened to find its way inside the Google Nexus 4 was its wireless charging capabilities. Compatible with the Wireless Power Consortium’s (WPC) Qi standard, this allows for the Nexus 4 to charge wirelessly with compatible docks right out of the box. No need for special battery covers, or ugly cases — it’s all built right in.

When Google first announced the Nexus 4, they talked briefly about a wireless charging dock for the device that they would, at some point, sell directly from the Google Play Store. We haven’t heard anything since, but if you’re looking to get in on some wireless charging of your very own, there’s no need to wait around for Google to appease you. There are plenty of Qi enabled wireless charging stations available right now from manufacturers like LG and Energizer.

While LG’s charging pad  seemed to work fine in the short 3 minutes of the video, I did find that it was a bit finicky and would disconnect/reconnect after a few minutes time. This resulted in a loud beeping noise coming from the pad letting you know it was connected, but for light sleepers out there, it may prove troublesome.


Energizer also has their wireless charging pads (you can find ‘em at retail stores like Target or Walmart), and reviews seem to be mixed when it comes to Nexus 4 users. The glass backing on the Nexus 4 causes the device to slip around and because Energizer’s pads are on a slight incline, they could cause the phone to completely slide off the pad altogether. You can see where a bumper case would come in handy for added grip (or a can of Plasti-Dip). Energizer’s pad did fare better in the rest of the review, keeping the device charging constantly, and requiring little-to-no fuss in regards to placement.

While the convenience of wireless charging is still under some review (holding your device while it’s charging is pretty much out of the question), there is a definite effort to bring wireless charging into the mainstream. The only problem, like most things, is there’s 2 main camps fighting to become that standard: Duracell/Powermat’s Power Matters Alliance, backed by AT&T, Starbucks, at Google — and the Wireless Power Consortium. Who will come out on top is anyone’s guess.



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Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Microsoft's first Windows Phone 8 update dubbed Apollo Plus?

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Here's a quick refresher on code names. The Windows Phone team has been all about the o's. Windows Phone 7 OS was code-named NoDo. Then there was Mango (Windows Phone 7.5). A minor interim update arrived next, code-named Tango. And Windows Phone 8 OS was code-named Apollo. Joe Belfiore(o), manager of the Windows Phone Program, said awhile back that the team was finished with code names ending in "o."
So what was Windows Phone 8's successor going to be called?
Winsyde.com posted earlier today that the next release will be code-named "Apollo +," and that it would be available in Q1 2013 -- citing the @Football4PDA Twitter account as the source. The Verge subsequently posted that the code name of Windows Phone OS 8's follow-on would be "Apollo Plus." (Maybe the ban on code names ending with "o" doesn't start till Windows Phone 9 OS?)


The Verge's Tom Warren also reported that Microsoft would share details about the update at the Mobile World Congress show in February 2013. The Verge cited unnamed sources as providing the information and said the coming update could include features like VPN support, a Wi-Fi connectivity fix, and audio improvements.

VPN support is an interesting one, given Microsoft officials said in June of this year that Microsoft had decided against including VPN functionality in the Windows Phone operating system (even though it had been included in Windows Phone OS' predecessor, Windows Mobile). A Microsoft official told me that Microsoft has decided instead to rely on things like Secure SSL to address this need... as they considered Secure SSL "a better, light-weight approach" to providing this kind of functionality in the new BYOD (bring your own device) world.
I've since heard from a number of business users that no VPN support was a deal breaker for their organizations in adopting Windows Phone. I've also heard from users in countries with governments that censor their citizens' Web-browsing that VPN is a much-desired feature for circumventing officially imposed firewalls.
I asked Microsoft whether the next version of the Windows Phone OS was code-named "Apollo Plus" and whether VPN connectivity will be part of it. Not surprisingly, a spokesperson said only that the company doesn't comment on rumors and speculation.
If Microsoft does refer to the minor, interim update to Windows Phone 8 OS as "Apollo Plus," that might help dampen user expectations a bit. With Tango, many users were expecting a lot more, feature-wise, than ended up being part of that update because it had its own special code name.
Meanwhile, I also asked Microsoft about the whereabouts of the Windows Phone OS 7.8 update -- the one that is slated to allow existing Windows Phone 7 users to make use of resizable tiles on their phones. A Microsoft spokesperson said: "More information on 7.8 will be available in the coming weeks."
As to the rumors circulating that 7.8 might be available this week, I'm doubtful. I think Microsoft might announce the release to manufacturing of 7.8 this week, but I'm hearing the update may not be available from the carriers until early next year (maybe even as late as February 2013)





This story originally posted as "Apollo Plus: Is this Microsoft's first Windows Phone 8 update?" on ZDNet.
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LG Optimus G2 with dual Qore CPU and Android 5.0

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LG Optimus G has just landed to some countries. However, rumors about the successor of the mobile phone was already emerging. A successor is said to have the name of LG Optimus G2. This phone is rumored to have a more advanced specification than the Optimus G.



Mobile is said to be present with Krait-based quad-core processor with a speed of 2GHz or 2.5GHz. In addition, the phone will also be equipped with Adreno 320 GPU, and at least 2 GB of RAM.

Still not enough, LG is also rumored to be pinned full HD 1080p screen on the mobile phone. Moreover, the company is currently based in South Korea is indeed developing a full-screen HD. So it is not surprising that they would use the Optimus G2.

Regarding the operating system, is expected this phone is already using Android OS 5.0 Key Lime Pie. As for the camera, there is a 13 MP camera on the back.


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Saturday, November 24, 2012

iPhone 5 Real Tips and Tricks

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1. how to Opening and closing apps: It is simple enough, but I think many people don't know how to close apps out of the system tray. You should know how to do this every now and then if an app is acting funny or crashing. To open an app, just tap on it. To close an app out of the tray, go to your home screen & double tap the home button and all of your most recently used apps will pop up. then Press and hold any one of the apps until they start wiggling and you can hit the red badges on the apps you want to close.thats only.



2. how to Lock and unlock screen orientation:you want the screen to stay in portrait mode while you're lying down in bed or on the grass at a picnic, simply two tap your home button to bring up the system tray.then Swipe the tray to the left and you will see the orientation lock at the far left. Simply tap it to turn it on or off.


3.How to use Apple Siri: When you need a  help from Apple's digital assistant, you press and hold the home button for a few seconds and you will see Siri's microphone pop up on your screen. Tell to set a calendar event to you or to set an alarm.Siri reserve tables at restaurants or give you movie times and reviews. If you're unsure what you can ask Siri, press the little "i" when the microphone pops up.




4.How to view your notifications, current weather and more: To see that black bar up at the top of your screen? You can touch it and drag it down to view your notifications and all other things. When you are in an app or game where the bar is not visiblevto you, swipe down from the very top of your screen and you will see a tab slide out. Pull that tab down and the notification pane will slide down on your screen.


5.To find apps, contacts, e-mails and many more : When you are on the first page of your iPhone home screen, just swipe to the left and the iPhone 5's universal search bar will appear. Type find what you are looking for there.


6. Shoot photos with your camera, then do a little more with it: Open up the camera app tapping on the camera icon, then press the shutter button or volume up key to snap photos. For more function, Press the Options button and you will see toggle switches for Grid, HDR and a panorama button. You can  flash on and off or set it to auto, or switch to the front-facing camera. The grid comes up to help you compost images and make sure your horizons are straight. HDR makes sure you get details in photos that have very bright and very dark areas . The Panorama button will take you to a new feature in iOS 6 that allows you to take a sweeping photo of a very wide scene. Follow the instructions that pop up on the screen.


7.To set a passcode lock and protect for your phone: Go into Settings>> click General then scroll down to Passcode Lock. Turn it on and select a code that you want. iphones tend to have social networks, e-mail, photos and other sensitive items that we want to keep from prying eyes, so be sure to lock your device for your seaf.


8. How to take a screen shot: See something on your device screen that you want to  keep as a photo? just take a screen shot.  press the power button up top and your home button at the exact same time any time. you are in an application, on the home screen, in a game or everywhere press those two buttons at the same time and a screen shot will be saved into your Photos app.


9. How to save a Web page into your home screen: When you are on the web page you want to access quickly it from your home screen, tap the arrow button on the menu bar at the bottom of the phone screen. The option list come; now select "Add to Home Screen." Now you will have an icon on your home screen that will take you to that Web page.


10.How to insert images to your e-mail: You can when you are composing an e-mail and you decide you want to throw an image into the e-mail body? it is simply go into your photos app then, in the gallery view, click the edit button on the upper right. Select the image or images you want and click copy. Return to your e-mail, After that press and hold in the body where do you want to insert the images, finaly select and "paste."
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Thursday, November 22, 2012

iPhone 5 best

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The good: The iPhone 5 adds everything we wanted in the iPhone 4S: 4G LTE, a longer, larger screen, free turn-by-turn navigation, and a faster A6 processor. Plus, its top-to-bottom redesign is sharp, slim, and feather-light.
The bad: Apple Maps feels unfinished and buggy; Sprint and Verizon models can't use voice and data simultaneously. The smaller connector renders current accessories unusable without an adapter. There's no NFC, and the screen size pales in comparison to jumbo Android models.
The bottom line: The iPhone 5 completely rebuilds the iPhone on a framework of new features and design, addressing its major previous shortcomings. It's absolutely the best iPhone to date, and it easily secures its place in the top tier of the smartphone universe.

The iPhone 5 is the iPhone we've wanted since 2010, adding long-overdue upgrades like a larger screen and faster 4G LTE in a razor-sharp new design. This is the iPhone, rebooted.

The new design is flat-out lovely, both to look at and to hold, and it's hard to find a single part that hasn't been tweaked from the iPhone 4S. The iPhone 5 is at once completely rebuilt and completely familiar.

I've had the chance to use the iPhone 5 for nearly a week, and have been using it for nearly anything I can think of. Is it as futuristic or as exciting as the iPhone 4 or the original iPhone? No. Does this change the smartphone game? No. Other smartphones beat it on features here and there: if you want a larger screen, go with a Samsung Galaxy S3. If you want better battery life, go with a Droid Razr Maxx.

But, if you want a great, all-around, beautifully engineered smartphone that covers all bases, here it is. Just like the MacBook is to the world of laptops, the new iPhone is one of the top three, if not the best-designed, smartphone around. It's better in all the important ways.
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Wednesday, November 21, 2012

galaxy s4

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Fresh rumours have hit the internet suggesting that the Samsung Galaxy S4 will launch with a full HD 1080p display and a powerful quad-core A15 processor.

 These include the suggestion that the Samsung Galaxy S4 will be including a 5-inch (or 4.99-inch, to be precise) Super AMOLED display with a 1080p resolution.

With rival HTC launching its own 1080p smartphone in several countries - the HTC DNA in the US, the HTC J Butterfly in Japan - this seems highly likely to us.

According to a new Korean source, Samsung will be showing its 1080p Super AMOLED displays off at CES in January. And yes, the lack of a + sign at the end of Super AMOLED would suggest that Samsung is sticking with those PenTile displays, but let's not read too much into rumours, eh?

Moving on to those processor rumours, it's being suggested that the Samsung Galaxy S4 will run on a 2GHz quad-core variant of Samsung's own Exynos 5450 CPU.

The Exynos 5450 is built using next generation ARM Coretex-A15 architecture, which provides an estimated 40 per cent power boost over equivalent A9 chips (which is what the Samsung Galaxy S3's processor is built on).

Elsewhere, the rumours suggest that the Samsung Galaxy S4 will be getting a 13-megapixel camera.
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Monday, November 19, 2012

Sony Xperia GX Specs & review

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The Sony Xperia GX is an Android 4.0-based LTE handset with a 13-megapixel camera and is made for release in Japan. It features a 4.6-inch, 720p "Reality Display" utilizing Sony's Mobile Bravia Engine, a dual-core 1.5GHz processor, and 16GB of internal storage.


Besides Xperia Ion targeted for the Japanese market, Sony has introduced two mobile phones, one of which adopt 4G LTE technology in Japan. The phone in question is the Xperia GX. This device runs on the Android 4.0 operating system or the more famous by the name of Ice Cream Sandwich.

And as mentioned about the camera, the Xperia GX offers high resolution 13 MP camera with HD video recording capabilities and LED flash.

Sony Xperia GX

The GX has a display size of 4.6 inch Mobile BRAVIA and dual-core processor 1.5 GHz. For internal storage, 16 GB of space served.

With LTE technology, Sony claims this divice is capable of downloading up to 75Mbps.

Unfortunately, this Smartphone just released in Japan. Sony has not announced pricing, and plans to sell the Xperia GX in other countries.


 Sony Xperia GX full specification look this table :
Overview 2G Network GSM 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900
3G Network  HSDPA
4G Network LTE 2100
SIM Micro-SIM
Announced 2012, May
Status Available. Released 2012, August
Design Dimensions 131 x 69 x 8.6 mm (5.16 x 2.72 x 0.34 in)
Weight 127 g (4.48 oz)
  - Touch-sensitive controls
Display Type LED-backlit LCD, capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Size 720 x 1280 pixels, 4.6 inches (~319 ppi pixel density)
Multitouch Yes, up to 10 fingers
Protection Scratch-resistant glass
- Sony Mobile BRAVIA Engine
- Timescape UI
Ringtones Alert types Vibration; MP3 ringtones
Loudspeaker Yes3.5mm jack Yes
Storage Card slot microSD, up to 32 GB
Internal 16 GB storage, 1GB RAM
Connectivity GPRS Up to 86 kbps
EDGE Up to 237 kbps
Speed HSDPA, 14.4 Mbps; HSUPA, 5.76 Mbps; LTE, 25 Mbps UL, 75 Mbps DL
WLAN Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct, DLNA, Wi-Fi hotspot
Bluetooth Yes, v3.1 with A2DP
USB Yes, microUSB (MHL) v2.0
Camera Primary 13 MP, autofocus, LED flash
Features Geo-tagging, touch focus, face and smile detection, 3D sweep panorama, image stabilization
Video Yes, 1080p@30fps, continuous autofocus, video light, video stabilizer
Secondary Yes, 1.3 MP, 720p@30fps
Platform OS Android OS, v4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich)
Chipset Qualcomm MSM8960 Snapdragon
CPU Dual-core 1.5 GHz Krait
GPU Adreno 225
Features Sensors Accelerometer, gyro, proximity, compass
Messaging SMS (threaded view), MMS, Email, IM, Push Email
Browser HTML5, Adobe Flash
Radio No
GPS Yes, with A-GPS support
Java Yes, via Java MIDP emulator
Colors Black, White
- SNS integration
- TV-out (via MHL A/V link)
- Active noise cancellation with dedicated mic
- MP4/H.263/H.264/WMV player
- MP3/eAAC+/WMA/WAV player
- TrackID music recognition
- Google Search, Maps, Gmail,
YouTube, Calendar, Google Talk
- Document viewer
- Voice memo/dial/commands
- Predictive text input
Battery Standard battery, Li-Ion 1700 mAh
Stand-by Up to 300 h (2G) / Up to 380 h (3G)
Talk time Up to 6 h 40 min (2G) / Up to 6 h 40 min (3G)

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Google Nexus 4 Review

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Introduction:

Google's Nexus smartphones have always set the standard when it comes to a pure Google experience.
The first Nexus One was a true geek device. Sold only through Google directly , it never achieved massive sales. But it gave the world the true raw power of Android without the bloatware of other variants. As of January 2010, the ball was well and truly rolling.

Moving steadily along with momentum on its side, Korean-based manufacturer LG is seeing itself in a very unfamiliar position in the smartphone industry. For a change, the spotlight has been directed at them of late – thanks primarily to the recent launch of its flagship device in the LG Optimus G. And with that going for them, it surely surprised many when the first rumors started coming around hinting to the notion that they would be the one to actually produce the next Google Nexus device.

Without question, it’s a prized opportunity to be the one chosen by Google to come up with the next Nexus smartphone, since as we know all too well, they’re highly prized items sporting the latest and greatest with Android. Oppositely, for the Mountain View based company, they’re also shifting into top gear by bringing the heat to the competition this holiday season. Combining the two’s efforts, they’ve collaborated in producing the Google Nexus 4 – the fourth generations Nexus smartphone.

Already in the last couple of months, we’ve seen some fantastic smartphones come to market – with each one seemingly raising the bar. In a time when we’re presented with renowned devices such as the iPhone 5, Samsung Galaxy Note II, Nokia Lumia 920, HTC DROID DNA, and even the LG Optimus G, one can only imagine the kind of star power needed by the Google Nexus 4 to stand apart from all the rest. Well, seeing that we’re given the latest flavor of Jelly Bean, combined with one unimaginable price point, it seems as though the Nexus 4 has all the correct ingredients to make a meaningful, yet highly prized smartphone in this cutthroat business.

The package contains:


microUSB cable
Wall charger
Quick Start Guide
Safety & Warranty Guide
Terms & Conditions, Return Policy, and Limited Warranty Guide

Design:


Arguably, the last two Nexus smartphones put out by Samsung haven’t been cutting-edge per se in the design department, but thankfully enough, LG manages to bring back a small sprinkling of premium to the beloved line. But to tell you the truth, the overall design of the Nexus 4 still doesn’t match the precision and attention to detail seen with the original Nexus One. From the front, its minimalistic and clean surface stands out most prominently, but as a whole, it looks very much like the Galaxy Nexus from last year. However, it’s in the rear that we’re most impressed with the handset, since it’s employing a cool looking pattern design very similar to what’s seen over with the “Crystal Reflection” rear casing of the Optimus G. Depending on the angle, it sparkles brilliantly with its alternating dotted patterns. Even better, the glass casing layered on top of it adds that desired level of premium to its entire construction.
Strangely though, the Nexus 4 comes of being super slippery in the hand – attributed to the handset’s front and rear surfaces being covered in glass. In fact, it’s so very slippery that when we place it on a surface with a slight incline, it begins to slowly slide down, and in many instances, we’re always left to remind ourselves to keep an eye on it. Additionally, it’s a magnet for all the nasty baddies out there that dirty up its beauty – like fingerprints and smudges. With the help of a cloth, though, they’re relatively gone in one quick wipe, thus, bringing it back to its pristine appearance. Compared to other recent handsets, the Nexus 4 doesn’t attempt to push its construction to the limits, which is evident by its 0.36-inch thick profile and 4.9 oz weight – making it still somewhat unwieldy to hold in the hand. Ultimately, if it weren’t for the glass casing and enchanting pattern design of the rear, this would’ve been a blandAttached with the Nexus moniker, it doesn’t surprise us there are no capacitive buttons below the screen on this beauty, but rather, its LED pulse notification light is positioned there instead. On the opposite edge, we greeted with the usual suspect of characters – these include its earpiece, light & proximity sensors, and front-facing 1.3-megapixel camera, the latter of which can shoot video in 720p. looking handset
Checking out the items littered along its trim, which is sporting a matte soft touch coating, we find its volume control on the left edge and power button on the right. Raised slightly above the surface, they’re distinctive enough to feel out with our fingers, but even better, they exhibit good feedback when pressed.

Along the top trim, there’s the 3.5mm headset jack and noise-cancelling microphone – while on the bottom, we’re left with only the standard mic and microUSB port for charging/data/video-out connectivity. Somewhat of a bummer, the Nexus 4 forgoes using a more favorable MHL port for video-out functionality, and instead, it relies on a Slimport socket, which means you’ll need to purchase yet another proprietary adapter in order to connect it to a high-def TV. Additionally, it boasts wireless video-out functionality too, but you’ll need to have equipment that’s compatible with Miracast’s wireless display standard – again, it’s a complex process, sadly.
Flush to the glass surface of the rear, the Nexus 4 is sporting an 8-megapixel auto-focus camera with LED flash, which is capable of shooting 1080p videos. And finally, the narrow speaker grill is located towards the bottom right of the rear casing. Seeing that it’s sporting a closed design, there’s no easy access to its internal 2,100 mAh battery.


Display:


Having seen the razor sharp and awe-inspiring 1080p display of the HTC DROID DNA, there isn’t much wow factor seen with the Nexus 4’s display anymore. To tell you the truth, though, it’s the same one used by the LG Optimus G – so it’s been done before already! Regardless of that, there are some noteworthy elements seen with its 4.7-inch WXGA 768 x 1280 True HD IPS Plus display.


For starters, it’s still one detailed thing with its above average pixel density of 318 ppi – and that’s despite being outdone by the DROID DNA. Secondly, since it’s relying on good old IPS LCD technology, it delivers colors that are the most natural in tone, giving it a distinctive realistic appearance over the saturated tones put out by the rival AMOLED technology. And finally, it works rather well when it matters the most with outdoor visibility, which is attributed to its strong brightness output, decent reflection rate and wide viewing angles.

Protecting everything, its screen is soundly reinforced with Gorilla Glass 2, which is rounded around the trim to seamlessly transition and mix well with its sides. Just like on the Optimus G, it’s utilizing Zerogap technology that simply combines the LCD panel with the glass and eliminates the air gap usually found there, to make it appear closer to the surface. All in all, it’s sharp looking no doubt, but as we’ve made it transparent, it’s nothing that’s ground-breaking.

Camara

The Nexus 4 comes with two cameras – an 8MP job around the back and a 1.3MP snapper on the front.
8MP seems to be the industry standard at the moment – but as we're constantly reminded, it's not about the megapixels but so much more. Elements including the aperture, the compression and all that stuff have a part to play. Brains vs brawn and so on.

Battery life


This is where we'd normally moan about the fact that the power pack is sealed into the unit. It's becoming more and more popular for handset manufacturers to do this.Normally, we're told it is to keep the size down and the aesthetics to a high standard. But the result is always the same: looks nice, but battery is rubbish.
Gladly, we can say that's not the case with the Nexus 4. Of course, individual usage will vary wildly, but we found it to put in a competent enough performance.
We took our review unit off charge at 7am. We did the obligatory check of emails, tweets, facebook messages and SMS.
Over the course of the day, we made just under half an hour's worth of calls, browsed the web for about 40 mins between 3G and Wi-Fi, checked Twitter and Facebook half a dozen times each, took 10 photos and three videos and listened to music for about half an hour.
By the time we got home at 5pm, the Nexus 4 had told us the charge was hitting 15% but then we managed to keep it going with minimal use until we went to bed at 9pm.
We must also point out that much of the day was spent in a basement office with poor signal, so the Nexus 4 was constantly searching.
We'd call that a good result and with frugal use, you'll squeeze at least another few hours out of this. For a modern handset, it's impressive and we are really pleased.
It's most definitely an improvement on the HTC One X and even trumps the Samsung Galaxy S3 which is, itself, no slouch in that department. The thing is that it is so dependent on what Android apps you have installed and what they're doing in the background.
It's even more of a bonus because despite Jelly Bean having brought performance enhancements, one thing that has degraded is battery life.
We've heard nothing but complaints from people who've upgraded from Ice Cream Sandwich that ICS was better. Turning off Google Now appears to make a difference, but only a minor one.
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Sunday, November 18, 2012

Sony Xperia U advantages and disadvantares

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You know the Sony Xperia U right? Xperia U is one of the first smartphone to be launched by Sony after the official split with Ericsson a few months ago. Previously Sony has also released Xperia S for the premium consumers and Xperia P to middle class consumers, and the Xperia U is intended for lower-class segment.

Sony Xperia U is a mobile phone with dual core processor and comes with Android OS 2.3 Gingerbread although the later can be upgraded to a higher version of the Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich shortly after that. U Xperia equip himself with a 5 megapixel camera and comes with lots of other supporting features such as autofocus and LED flash.

And the following key features or advantages in the Xperia U:

Quad-band GSM /GPRS/EDGE support
3.5" 16M-color capacitive touchscreen of Full WVGA resolution (854 x 480 pixels) with Sony Mobile BRAVIA engine
Android OS v2.3.7 Gingerbread, planned Android 4.0 ICS update
Dual-core 1 GHz Cortex-A9 CPU, 512 MB RAM, NovaThor U8500 chipset
5 MP autofocus camera with LED flash and geotagging, Multi Angle shot
720p video recording @ 30fps with continuous autofocus and stereo sound
Wi-Fi b/g/n and DLNA
GPS with A-GPS
8 GB built-in storage (6 GB user-accessible)
microUSB port (charging) and stereo Bluetooth v2.1
Standard 3.5 mm audio jack
Stereo FM radio with RDS
Voice dialing
Adobe Flash 11 support
Deep Facebook integration
Accelerometer and proximity sensor
Transparent stripe changes color depending on screen content
Replaceable cap at the bottom allows easy customization

While the disadvantages of Xperia U include:
Limited storage with no expansion options
No Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich out of box
Some competitors are slimmer

Well, the article about the advantages and disadvantages of the Sony Xperia U for you all. if unclear please speak up via comments below.



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Saturday, November 17, 2012

LG Optimus G for AT&T and Sprint review

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Introduction

With the dust barely settled after the Korean LG Optimus G's run around out review track, we have its LTE packing, US siblings on our hands. The LG Optimus G E970 for AT&T and its LS970 relative for Sprint are the two versions which are offered across the Atlantic. Thankfully, the wait for their arrival wasn't long at all - LG pulled off a launch which looked a lot like what Samsung did with the Galaxy SIII earlier this year.


The LG Optimus G E970 and its LS970 relative are slightly different characters. The AT&T version comes with an 8MP camera and a microSD card slot. The Sprint-flavored Optimus G on the other hand, is practically identical to the Korean version, which we have reviewed already. This means that users will enjoy a larger, 13MP camera sensor, but will have to settle for 32GB on non-expandable memory.
Most importantly however, both smartphones come with the headline grabbing Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro chipset and two gigs of RAM, which means that, regardless which one they pick, potential users will get to enjoy the most powerful Android hardware around.
Here goes the full list of talents which the US LG Optimus G duo has to offer.

Key features

Quad-band GSM/GPRS/EDGE support
3G with HSPA; LTE
CDMA network support (Sprint Wireless version only)
4.7" 16M-color WXGA True HD IPS Plus (768 x 1280 pixels) capacitive touchscreen, Gorilla Glass
Android OS v4.0.4 Ice Cream Sandwich, planned upgrade to 4.1 Jelly Bean, LG Optimus UI 3.0
Quad-core 1.5 GHz Krait CPU, 2 GB RAM, Adreno 320 GPU, Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 Pro chipset
13 MP autofocus camera with LED flash and geotagging, image stabilization, Time catch shot, smart shutter (Sprint version)
8 MP autofocus camera with LED (AT&T version)
1080p video recording @ 30fps with continuous autofocus and stereo sound
1.3 MP front-facing camera, 720p video recording
Wi-Fi a/b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct and DLNA
GPS with A-GPS, GLONASS
32GB of built-in storage (Sprint version)
16GB of built-in storage; microSD card slot with 16GB card preinstalled (AT&T version)
MHL-enabled microUSB port, USB host support
Bluetooth v4.0
Standard 3.5 mm audio jack
Voice dialing
Two app overlay mode for multi-tasking (Q Slide)
Independent multimedia content output through MHL (Dual Screen Dual Play)
Accelerometer and proximity sensor
Active noise cancellation with dedicated mic

Main disadvantages

No microSD card slot on the Sprint version
No Jelly Bean at launch
Screens have mediocre sunlight legibility
Non user-replaceable battery
There is hardly a box left unchecked by the LG Optimus G duo. Both devices offer impressive hardware and gorgeous screens. Even the software is a massive improvement over LG smartphones of old.
Of course, the long list of features can do anything for a smartphone but guarantee its success. This is particularly the case in the US market, where the LG Optimus G has to face incredibly stiff competition.


We are going to kick the review off with a quick unboxing, followed by a design and build quality inspection of both the LG Optimus G for AT&T and Sprint Wireless. The dedicated camera section on the other hand, will closely examine and compare LG's 13MP and 8MP camera sensors' performance.
Editorial: You might notice that this review is shorter than usual and doesn't include all of our proprietary tests. The reason is it has been prepared and written far away from our office and test lab. The LG Optimus G for AT&T and Sprint are US-only phones, so they will probably never get to the shores of the Old Continent. Still, we think we've captured the essence of the phones in the same precise, informative and detailed way that's become our trademark. Enjoy the good read!


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iPad4

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Introduction

Three Apple tablets in a single year. This is more than anyone asked for and yet, by some weird logic - or lack thereof, not too many for Apple to successfully sell. All fine and dandy, unless you got the iPad 3 - better luck next time if you were unfortunate enough to buy it in September.
Well, so much for the new iPad. Number 4 is the new new iPad. You must've heard the one about the double positives. Did we hear some iPad 3 owners say "Yeah, right"? To be honest, they're not without a point.Anyway, the tablet market is still Apple's to lose and the least it could do is send a message to the competition. The double November release may look like a knee-jerk reaction to Google and Microsoft's raid on the slate market but the fact is that Apple has the depth to compete on two fronts. The mini against compact droids and the iPad 4 against the Surface means Cupertino is leaving nothing to chance in defending its number one spot.
The fourth generation iPad is no major upgrade. It keeps the design, display and the main camera of its predecessor. What it gets is a new chipset and the new Lightning port. Oh, and there's an HD FaceTime front cam but that's barely worth mentioning.
Overall, it's the same tablet as the one released in March, with the class-leading Retina display and a welcome boost to the processing power. Plus, the Lightning port ensures seamless compatibility with the iPhone 5, which has sold by the millions.

Key features

9.7" LED-backlit IPS LCD touchscreen, 2048 x 1536 pixels; scratch-resistant, oleophobic coating
Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n connectivity, carrier-dependent hotspot support
Optional LTE connectivity (data only)
Optional GPS with A-GPS and GLONASS support (for the 3G model only)
Apple A6X SoC with 1 GHz dual-core processor
PowerVR SGX554MP4 quad-core GPU
1GB of RAM
iOS 6.0 with iCloud support and activation
16/32/64GB of inbuilt storage
652 grams of weight (662 grams for the LTE version)
Bluetooth 4.0
Lightning USB port
11,560 mAh battery
Accelerometer, compass and three-axis gyro-sensor
5MP auto-focus camera
1080p video recording at 30fps
1.2MP secondary camera capable of FaceTime HD calls
Four and five-finger gestures
1080p TV-output with the Apple Digital AV Adapter (purchased separately for $39), 720p video streaming
Supports magnetic cases
Main disadvantages
iTunes still required for uploading most of the content
Reflective screen struggles outdoors
No standard USB port
No stereo speakers
No GPS receiver in the Wi-Fi version
No memory card slot
Lack of basic iOS apps - stocks, clock, calculator, voice memos
It's an Apple device so things like a file manager and a memory card slot are not even up for discussion. They'll probably never be. Nothing on the list above should come as a surprise and, if you are still with us, you are OK with most of it.
The A6X chipset potentially doubles the processing power but let's be honest, the real life gain is not enough to make anyone throw away a still fresh iPad 3. Yet that's what Apple just did - you can think of that as investing in the future-proofing of the device more than anything else.

iPad 4 over iPad 3

Apple A6X chipset with PowerVR554MP4 quad-core GPU for allegedly 2x faster performance
1.2MP front FaceTime camera with HD video
GLONASS support (for the cellular version only)
Lightning USB port
Whether or not Cupertino will admit to feeling the pressure from Microsoft, they knew the right thing to do is prepare. Apple could not afford to have development split between flagship devices running different hardware.

Someone had to take the hit and leaving iPad 3 users out in the cold was probably a hard decision for Apple. The new product launch schedule may've put the iPad 4's market prospects in question too - users are less certain whether they should commit to a new device that may soon become outdated. Apparently, the new Apple tablets are doing great, but the iPad 4 seems to be the one that's always in stock, while the mini takes about 2 weeks to deliver.
But the iPad mini already had its moment in the spotlight here, it's now iPad 4's turn to have our full attention. Before we get busy, we should note that numbers are the short and easy way to set the different generations of Apple tablets apart. What was until recently known as the New iPad (iPad 3) is now discontinued. The current model (iPad 4) is officially called iPad with Retina. The only older generation Apple tablet officially in circulation is the iPad 2. Quite a mess, indeed.





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Bluetooth Headset That you can Wear on Your Finger

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With a simple twist, The O.R.B. transforms from a ring to a headset worn on the ear that is capable of hands-free calling. Incorporating HiWave™ technology, the O.R.B. is a “Digitset™” that provides high-quality bone conduction audio without the discomfort of placing a device inside the ear. A deluxe edition also features an E Ink display for caller ID, text messaging, and calendar reminders.

To use the ring as a headset, simply remove it from the finger and twist open around the hinged joint. The ring (now a headset) is placed over the upper ear, between the ear and the side of the head. The transmitter end of the headset rests just above the jawbone and utilizes dual speaker “voice annihilation” DSP technology. The transmit exciter transducer rests just behind the outer ear.


The O.R.B. will be available in a variety of sizes, available in styles for both men and women.

All sizes have an expansion hinge, spring prongs and adjustable adhesive soft pads on the interior edge, which provide a secure and comfortable fit on the finger (or thumb) as well as the ear.


The O.R.B. features military-grade seals and gaskets, making it fully waterproof and built to accompany you on any adventure.


The ring vibrates, alerting the user to an incoming call, text message, or event reminder. The user can glance down at the finger and see a horizontal streaming message of caller I.D. or meeting schedules. If accepting an incoming call, the user twists open the O.R.B., slips over the ear, and begins the conversation. If declining incoming calls or texts, or dismissing event reminders, the user can simply push the cancel button with the O.R.B. still idle on their finger. When not in use the ring serves as a time device/alarm clock. If the user would like to silence a call he/she can simply touch a button on the band.



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Friday, November 16, 2012

SAMSUNG GALAXY S IV RUMORED TO DEBUT AT CES IN JANUARY, MAY FEATURE A 5-INCH 1080P DISPLAY

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The latest trend in the mobile industry seems to be the move towards 5-inch full HD displays. Companies such as HTC (2498) Sony (SNE) and LG (066570) have already added, or are planning to include, higher resolution displays on their products. Not to be left behind, Asia Economics reported on Friday that Samsung (005930) is planning to introduce a smartphone with a large 1920 x 1080 resolution display at the annual Consumer Electronics Show in January. The handset is said to be the company’s next flagship device, known as the Galaxy S IV, and will be equipped with a 5-inch full HD AMOLED display that includes a pixel density of 441 pixels-per-inch.

The report follows an earlier rumor that claimed the South Korean vendor was planning to release the Galaxy S IV this coming March. The previous report claimed the company was going to unveil the device at Mobile World Congress in February, however, rather than at CES. The Galaxy S IV is also said to include a quad-core Exynos processor and 4G LTE capabilities.

Samsung has repeatedly denied any and all Galaxy S IV rumors.


We’ve just had the release of Android 4.2 Jelly Bean with the new Nexus 4 phone and by the time the Galaxy S4 arrives it seems likely that it will run the next major OS upgrade, Key Lime Pie, although it’s too early to tell whether this might be 4.3 or possibly Android 5.0. Other inclusions that seem more than plausible are LTE and NFC and possibly enhanced versions of S Voice and Nature UX. As far as processor, a step up to a 2GHz quad-core Exynos processor doesn’t sound impossible and while ever-increasing screen sizes are very much the trend we feel the 4.8-inches of the Galaxy S3 is still plenty big enough.

Talking about displays, we’ve spoken before about the new flexible Youm displays that Samsung is developing for 2013 and so it also looks feasible that a flexible display may feature on either the Galaxy S4 or the Galaxy Note 3. On top of all this with the anticipated spec upgrades we are hoping for we’d like to see a much larger battery capacity to cope with it all. You may also be interested in our previous look at a video concept design for the Galaxy S4.


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Xperia TL

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introduction:


The name’s TL, Xperia TL. Just as the secret agent made famous in the big screen, this “James Bond phone” from Sony surely comes off as being nonchalant with its attitude, since it’s deceitfully packing some killer hardware under its fa├žade. No doubt, it’ll be making an appearance in the latest movie installment of the James Bond franchise, Skyfall, but more importantly, is this something that would actually impress even the famed secret agent?

If you’re scratching your head and wondering why this smartphone looks familiar, it’s because the Xperia TL is none other than a rebranded Sony Xperia T for the US market – AT&T’s lineup to be specific. Employing the Xperia Arc’s best element, the Xperia TL follows in form, as it’s able to stand out from other things for its arched back casing. Obviously, the overall design is undoubtedly Xperia-like, but it’s still a looker for its clean appearance, aluminum rear casing, solid construction, and modest size. More impressive is the fact that it’s actually smaller in footprint to the Sony Xperia ion from not too long ago, with the two sharing the same sized displays
.
There are no capacitive buttons beneath its display, mainly because Sony opts to incorporate its Android buttons with the interface, which is something that Ice Cream Sandwich is known for. Above the display, we find its earpiece, tiny LED notification light, and 1-megapixel front-facing camera – the latter of which can shoot videos in 720p.

Checking out the stuff littered around the handset’s trim, it features all the usual suspect of characters we’d expect to find – like a standard microphone, noise-cancelling mic, 3.5mm headset jack, microUSB port for charging/data/video-out connectivity, power button, shutter key, volume control, and a small plastic flap that hides away its microSIM and microSD slots


Display:


Being the James Bond phone and all, it’s naturally going to need one sharp looking display to keep even 007 interested. Luckily, its 4.55” HD 720 x 1280 display with Mobile BRAVIA Engine will turn heads thanks to its exceptional detail (323 ppi pixel density), warm color tones, and its deep black color. However, its usability is compromised in direct sunlight due to its high reflectiveness and weak viewing angles.

LAUNCH JAMES BOND’S SONY XPERIA TL ON NOVEMBER 2ND FOR $99.99

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Thursday, November 15, 2012

Galaxy Note II -Tips & Tricks:

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Application Integration


S Pen Integration: 
The Galaxy Note II lets you personalize your mobile world with the S Pen. You can write handwritten messages in emails or decorate special occasions on your calendars. Handwritten items are only viewable on your mobile calendar and are not synced with Outlook® or online calendars.

S Note on Lock Screen: 
Hold the S Pen button while double-tapping the screen to activate S Note™. This gesture can also be used on the Lock Screen to activate S Note. You can also use your S Pen to draw a line down to the Home key to unlock your screen instead of swiping your screen with your finger.

Contextual Home Screens: 
Much like the S Pen contextual home screen, there are additional contextual home screens displayed when you plug in the earphones and when you dock the phone.

Accessories


Smart Dock:
The optional Smart Dock accessory offers multiple connection points, with three USB ports, an audio-out port, and an HDMI port. Plus, the Galaxy Note II fits perfectly in the dock even when encased in a Samsung Flip Cover.
Gallery


Gallery Views: 

The Gallery offers a variety of ways to view your photos. You can choose between a Grid view (organized folders), Timeline view (a 3-D flipbook in chronological order), or a Spiral view (a spinning 3D spiral of photos) by touching the view icons in the top right corner of the Gallery.

One-Touch Cropping: 
S Pen makes it easy to crop a photo, or even just a small element of a photo, right in the Gallery. While viewing the photo you want to crop, click and hold the S Pen button, and draw around the desired cropping area. Your original photo will remain intact, but the cropped portion will be copied to your clipboard. You’ll also be given the option to send the cropped image to a variety of other applications, including email, S Note and Paper Artist.

Personalization

One-Handed Use:
You can enable one-handed use for the Samsung keyboard, calculator, phone dialer and unlock pattern. When you turn on the one-handed option, the enabled apps shrink and move toward one side of the screen so you can easily touch the keys with your thumb. Touch Settings and under Personal, choose One-handed operation. Place a checkmark in the box next to the desired options.


Smart Gestures

Enabling Smart Stay:
You can get key info—such as number of missed phone calls and messages, number of emails received, remaining battery percentage, and more—simply by waving your hand over the top of a sleeping device. To enable or disable this feature, go to Settings > Motion and check or uncheck the box next to Quick Glance.

Smart Gestures:
Smart Stay keeps the screen on as long as you’re looking at it. To enable the Smart Stay feature, touch Settings > Display. Place a checkmark in the box next to Smart Stay.

Notifications Panel:
Double-tap the top of the phone to instantly open the Notifications Panel.

Direct Call: 
When a contact’s phone number is shown on-screen, Direct Call lets you lift the phone to your ear to automatically dial. When reading a text message, you can call back the sender by simply lifting the phone to your ear.

Social Sharing

S Beam:
Use S Beam™ to share links to maps, web pages, apps and YouTube™ videos with any Android™ device that is NFC enabled. You can also exchange contacts and calendar events. S Beam allows for the transfer of files up to 1GB in size with any S Beam–capable device. To get started, touch Settings > Share and transfer > More settings. Move sliders next to NFC and S Beam from off to on (gray to green) to enable the feature.

Sharing an S Note with S Beam: 
In addition to photos, videos and documents, you can share an S Note via S Beam with other S Beam and S Note capable devices.

Sharing an S Note with Social Networks: 
Collaborate with ease by posting native S Note files, with layers, to your social networks like Facebook® and Google+™ for other Galaxy Note II users to download and edit.

S Pen

Contextual Home Screen:
Contextual awareness means quick access: When the S Pen is removed from its integrated slot, a menu of S Pen–related apps will automatically pop up for selection. The Contextual S Pen home screen and menu are customizable, so you can select which S Pen applications you want handy. Available apps range from productivity to graphic and include the preloaded S Note. Various third-party apps that use S Pen are also available.

S Pen Shortcuts: 
Use the S Pen to scroll down the Notifications Panel to select a number of S Pen shortcuts—Quick Command, S Note and more.

Voice Commands


S Voice: 
Whether you want trivia answers or directions to the closest dry cleaner, S Voice™ is your personal assistant, responding to every voice command with accurate, helpful information pulled from the respected Wolfram Alpha® database. S Voice handles your on-phone tasks too, like dialing calls, sending messages, launching the camera, and even opening and controlling applications. For example, you can use S Voice to open the Facebook® app and update your status.


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Music Hub: All The Music You Want, All In One Place

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Samsung Music Hub™ makes enjoying music easier than ever. Upload your music collection to the cloud, stream and purchase songs from an extensive catalog, and listen to personal radio—all in one app. Use these tips and tricks to learn more about how to use Music Hub’s features.


With Music Hub, you can access millions of songs from our catalog whenever and wherever you are. Simply tap Catalog and either browse by music genre or search using the magnifying glass icon. When you find a song or album you like, either tap the title to play or tap the icon to the right to add to My Music or to a specific playlist.

Listen Offline

Music Hub allows you to store your favorite music on your device for offline listening. There is nothing worse than remembering to store music offline minutes before the flight, and spend the entire flight listening to only two or three songs. Music Hub offers the simplest way to make music available offline in just two easy steps:

Step 1: Go to My Music and select the icon to the right of the song or playlist you like.

Step 2: Tap “Download Now.” This will default to Wi-Fi® only, but you can simply adjust the settings to enable this feature over your cellular network. Once you listen to a song, it is temporarily stored on your device and displayed in a bold font to indicate offline availability.


Share a Playlist


Music Hub allows you to beam songs and playlists with another Music Hub subscriber on a Samsung Galaxy NFC-enabled device. Follow these steps to share your playlist:
Step 1: Access the playlist you’d like to share from My Music.

Step 2: Open the playlist to view the tracks.

Step 3: Hold your phone against another Music Hub subscriber’s Galaxy device (remember to turn on NFC). The playlist image will shrink.

Step 4: Tap the center of the image to beam. The playlist will instantly appear in the other subscriber’s My Music.

Upload Your Music to the Cloud Locker & PC Listening


We understand that over the years you’ve accumulated a lot of digital music that you most likely manage in iTunes® and Windows® Media Player. With the Music Hub Uploader, it is easy to move your entire music library to the cloud. Music Hub subscribers are given 100 GB of cloud storage, and employs Scan & Match functionality to transfer your music, cutting down on upload time and offering you higher quality files where available.

Follow these steps to upload your music from your PC to the cloud:

Step 1: From your PC, go to Music Hub.

Step 2: Run the Uploader, and select your music folder—iTunes or Windows Media Player. A notification will appear when the upload process is complete. The next time you visit Music Hub on your mobile device, your music will instantly be available in My Music.

You can also listen to your music and music from our catalog on your PC from musichub.com. Simply sign in with your Samsung Account, and enjoy hours of music listening.



Enjoy Personal Radio



Sometimes it’s nice to sit back and enjoy music programmed for you. With personal radio, you can enjoy personalized radio stations based on your favorite artists or songs. Follow these two easy steps and start enjoying personal radio:

Step 1: From the home screen, select the radio icon and then select Personal.

Step 2: Type an artist or song, select from one of the generated stations, and enjoy ad-free listening. Feel free to skip ahead as often as you like.

At any point, tap the circled “i” icon and view all the songs you’ve just enjoyed. You can add any of them to your own collection by clicking the “tag” icon. These songs can be found in the Tagged section later and mixed into any of your playlists.


Get Intelligent Recommendations

One of the best elements of Music Hub is that it actually gets smarter the more you listen. There are two ways to take advantage of this great feature:

1. Simply double tap the album art on the player page to see options. Select the Lightbulb icon to find similar music to what you are listening to. A list of recommended songs, albums, artists and radio stations will be generated for you.

2. From the home screen, tap the Lightbulb icon for Recommended songs. A list of songs will be generated based on the songs you’ve been listening to.

Content such as DRM content or encrypted files may not transfer to your Samsung device.

Samsung, Galaxy S and Media Hub are trademarks of Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Other company names, product names and marks mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners and may be trademarks or registered trademarks. Screen images simulated. Appearance of device may vary.

The above content is provided for information purposes only. All information included herein is subject to change without notice. Samsung is not responsible for any direct or indirect damages, arising from or related to use or reliance of the above content.


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iPhone 6 (Release Date, Review, Price, Specs)

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Many of you weren’t sold on the iPhone 5′s design. For some of you the taller screen was odd – it “looks strange at best,” said nebulaoperator – and for others it simply wasn’t big enough. Lions87a reckons even 4.5 inches would be too little: “popular phones like the Galaxy S2 and S3 have shown that people are pretty happy nowadays to accept bigger than what the iPhone 5 is currently offering.” Writing in the Chicago Sun-Times, influential tech journalist Andy Ihnatko suggests that taller isn’t necessarily better. “The benefit of bigger screens is almost entirely in their increased width, not their length,” he writes. “A wider keyboard is easier to type on. Books, web pages, and emails will have wider margins and they’ll be more comfortable to read.”

John Gruber of Daring Fireball agrees that bigger isn’t always better, but he’s not a fan of wider, either: while he says that “navigating the full screen while holding the iPhone in one hand is worse,” rivals’ wider screens mean it “really is far more difficult to do anything on them one-handed, including typing.” A new set of patents filed by Apple, that we outlined on 15 October 2012, suggest that the iPhone 6 design might hide external-facing components such as the camera and flash from view using a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal window which can change opacity on demand.

The iPhone 6 will boost its processor not with the number of cores but with it’s software use. Even though the iPhone 6 will be using the A10 processor which is the fastest processor for any mobile device it will make the phone faster by updating it’s operating system to decrease the speed needed to run the current apps. Apple might also exploit the new technology IBM claims to have which can boost the processor speed without increasing the number of cores.

Operating System

iOS has been around for a while, and for many it’s getting stale. “I don’t think anyone can deny that the UI needs a refresh when you see widgets and live tiles on competitors’ phones,” says Vincennes, while Tubemonkey2000 says that “the current [UI] is so tired and old it makes it seem really basic, sort of like a kids’ toy.” Some say that “there are so many tweaks Apple could make to its OS to turn it into more of a powerhouse – icons that update with information, or extending the widgets in the notification bar beyond weather and stocks… Apple is taking things very slowly on this front.”

Price

iPhones have never been cheap, but in a world of credible – and cheaper – competition they look pricier than ever. Or maybe it’s because the iPhone’s price has gone up. Saltire is “surprised no-one has mentioned the price increase for the 16GB model”, while Gareth Beavis says that “we simply cannot see how a 16GB model can cost £529 / $199, but to double the memory will cost an extra £70/ $100 with no other changes to the design.” There’s no doubt that you pay more for the materials, fit and finish of an iPhone than you do for, say, a plasticky Android handset, and not everyone thinks that’s worth it. “£529 for a phone that is no better than my six month old Android shows the arrogance of Apple,” Alastairmack says, while Beavis points out that when you consider contracts, “it’s far and away the most expensive in the shop, and most of the time you don’t even get unlimited data.”

Features

NFC has, possibly unfairly, been dubbed “Not For Commerce” (or more saltily, “No Effing Customers”), but for many it’s the most obvious omission from the iPhone 5 – “not because of the technology itself,” says Fmartins, “but to really give the critical mass contactless payments need. Plus, I would love to use the phone as my Oyster card.” Apple is looking at Australian fingerprint technology for NFC mobile payments, so it seems that NFC could arrive with the iPhone 6.

Release Date

The exact date is unknown because Apple doesn’t want consumers to be ready and push off buying iPhone 5 until the 6 comes out. But the approximate date is in the middle of June.



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Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Apple iPhone 4S personal assistant Siri tells stories

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The Apple iPhone 4S exclusive voice prompted personal assistant Siri continues to spring surprises with latest reports revealing the system is capable of telling stories, albeit with some reluctance

Siri, the voice activated personal assistant on Apple’s latest smartphone offering, the iPhone 4S is capably of telling stories following continued nagging.

Despite being the subject of a series of security flaws Siri has made a number of headlines for its pre-programmed witty answers to a number of anticipated questions. The latest addition to this growing list is the systems ability to tell a story upon continued prompting.

The latest quirky Siri feature reportedly sees the iPhone 4S’ party piece try back out of telling a story stating it is “not much of a storyteller” before reeling off a comical fairytale.

“Once upon a time, in a virtual galaxy far far away, there was a young, quite intelligent agent by the name of Siri,” the system’s response reads. “One beautiful day, when the air was pink and all the trees were red, her friend Eliza said, “Siri, you’re so intelligent, and so helpful – you should go work for Apple as a personal assistant.””

Siri’s story ends in true fairytale fashion stating “So she did. And they all live happily ever after.”

Apple iPhone 4S Features

Exclusive to the Apple iPhone 4S, Siri has become the lead talking point of Apple’s latest pocket blower with the handset’s other notable inclusions inclusion the same ARM dual-core processor found within the Apple iPad 2 and a new, fully optimized 8-megapixel rear-mounted camera with 1080p full HD video recording capabilities.

Have you snapped up an Apple iPhone 4S already, what is the funniest response you have had from Siri? Let us know via the comments box below.

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Windows Phone 7.8 update dated for Q1 2013

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The first hint as to Microsoft's plan for owners of last-generation Windows Phone 7.5 handsets has been provided by the company's Brazilian arm, suggesting that an upgrade is due early next year.

Windows Phone 7.5 dates back to 2011 and introduced numerous new features to Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 platform ahead of the launch of Windows Phone 8. Those who had upgraded were hopeful for an eventual transition to the newer Windows Phone 8 OS, but those hopes were dashed by Microsoft's announcement that Windows Phone 8 would be exclusive to new handsets. Instead, Windows Phone 7.5 users are to be provided with a 'stop-gap' upgrade, Windows Phone 7.8, which back-ports some of the new features of Windows Phone 8 to older handsets.

Originally, Microsoft had planned to launch the Windows Phone 7.8 update alongside Windows Phone 8 in October, but that date has been and gone with no sign of the software for existing Windows Phone users. Microsoft has been silent on the reasons for the delay, and had yet to publicly comment on a revised launch schedule for the software until the company's Brazilian arm broke cover with a promise that the update would be launched by early next year.

Answering a customer's query as to the status of the update via microblogging site Twitter, the company explained that Windows Phone 7.8 will be launching in Brazil in the first quarter of 2013. With Microsoft originally planning a US launch for the software and then an international roll-out over the weeks following, it seems likely that Windows Phone 7.5 users should be offered the update by March next year at the latest.

Still to be announced, however, are the features from Windows Phone 8 that will be coming to older handsets as part of Windows Phone 7.8. Although a new start screen with customisable tiles is known to be part of the update, the remainder of the features are being kept under close wraps by Microsoft until closer to launch.


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Android 4.2 "Daydream" mode

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One of the new features of Android 4.2 that hasn't gotten much mention recently is the new "Daydream" mode. It hasn't gotten much play because unlike the other major updates like the gesture keyboard, Daydream mode is a flashy extra, but it is quite a nice one. If you've gotten the Android 4.2 update, you'll find Daydream kind of hidden in Settings>Display>Daydream.

It is essentially a screensaver, although it will only turn on under certain conditions. You can set your Android device to start Daydreaming either when the device is docked, when it is charging, or both. As the Daydream mode, users can choose between having the device display the clock, shifting colors, Google Currents headlines, or photos.

The clock and colors are fairly basic (although the clock has a nice feature to set the display to a "very dim mode", which is great for a bedside table), but this may be the first interesting use of Google Currents that we've seen. Currents has always been somewhat overshadowed by other apps that do the same sort of thing like Flipboard, Pulse News, or Feedly. Unfortunately, we say it is an interesting use of Currents because it isn't exactly useful. While it is nice to see the headline scroll of Currents in Daydream, it isn't interactive at all, so you can't tap an interesting headline to jump into the story. So, the whole thing ends up feeling a bit pointless.

Photos can be displayed in two different modes, either a slideshow, or as a "photo table" (basically a collage). For either option, users can choose to show photos that are on the device, or select any or all of your Google+/Picasa photo albums to cycle through. That is a great option for anyone who uses Google+/Picasa, or keeps all of their photos on their Android device at all times. But, if you use Flickr, Facebook, or Instagram, and don't keep copies on your device, this feature won't really do much for you.

Overall, Daydream mode is a nice new feature, and we can see some pretty interesting potential there for offering more options, but it definitely feels like a first attempt, and there is a reason why the feature is a bit buried. We'd love to see more services be able to hook into it, and we'd love to see the displays be more interactive, especially with headlines.



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Sony Xperia J Review

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Introduction:

Sony has a good track record for delivering decent mid-range Android smartphones at very competitive price points, and the Xperia J is the latest handset to join the party. Its 4-inch display and beefy battery are among the features that make it stand out, at least when comparing specs sheets with alternative offerings. A 1GHz processor, a 5-megapixel camera, and a VGA front-facing snapper are also in stock, meaning that the Sony Xperia J could be a bargain hunter's dream handset. But how does the smartphone perform in reality? Well, there's only one way to find out so let's fire it up and put the J through its paces.





Design:


As one would expect from a smartphone situated in the lower mid-range category, plastic is the predominant material that the Sony Xperia J is made of. The device's front side looks quite plain and boring, but its curved back side is a lot funkier and easily makes the handset stand out. With its matte finish, the smartphone's battery cover is extremely resistant to fingerprints, all the while providing enough grip, thus allowing us to comfortably hold and operate the device with a single hand.
With the Sony Xperia J you get a pair of notification lights. One of them is located right next to the earpiece and indicates when the smartphone is charging, but the one you'll probably find a lot more useful is at the bottom. It is of the RGB kind, so depending on what kind of notification you have pending – be it a new text, a new Facebook message, or a “Low battery” warning, the light glows in a different color. The light is hidden under the phone's plastic panel, so you won't see it unless it is on.

Display:


The 4-inch LCD display on the Sony Xperia J is actually quite good. At 480 by 854 pixels, it may not be worthy of having an “HD” tag attached to it, yet with its 245 pixels per inch, the amount of detail it treats our eyes to is sufficient for the device's class. Moreover, the panel has a pretty neutral color representation, so colors look neither too dull, nor too saturated. We were also pleased to see that the display exhibits very wide viewing angles, and it shines bright enough to be usable in broad daylight. It is a bit annoying, however, that due to the lack of an ambient light sensor, you'll have to adjust the screen's brightness yourself, either by going to the Settings menu or with the help of a widget.

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Sony Xperia T review

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Back when the driving seat was shared with Ericsson, Sony was a little short of delivering a real winner in the high-end market, the company's top-range smartphones always a notch below the Galaxy S lineup and their HTC counterparts. Now on their own, Sony cannot shy away from the toughest of battles and the Sony Xperia T is ready to be thrown in the fire.


A true flagship, the Sony Xperia T comes properly powered by a Snapdragon S4 chipset, boasting a class-leading 13MP camera and a marvelously sounding 720p display. There's no quad-core on its resume, but the Xperia T is ready to take on the best Android offerings out there.
Key features
Quad-band GSM /GPRS/EDGE support
3G with 42.2 Mbps HSDPA and 5.76 Mbps HSUPA
4.55" 16M-color capacitive LED-backlit LCD touchscreen of 720p resolution (720 x 1280 pixels) with Sony Mobile BRAVIA engine; Scratch-resistant glass
Android OS v4.0.4 Ice Cream Sandwich
Dual-core 1.5 GHz Krait CPU, 1 GB RAM, Adreno 225 GPU, Qualcomm Snapdragon MSM8260A chipset
13 MP autofocus camera with LED flash and geotagging, Multi Angle shot
1080p video recording @ 30fps with continuous autofocus and stereo sound
1.3 MP front-facing camera, 720p video recording
Wi-Fi b/g/n and DLNA
GPS with A-GPS, GLONASS
16GB of built-in storage, microSD card slot
microUSB port with MHL and USB-host support
Stereo Bluetooth v3.1
Standard 3.5 mm audio jack
Stereo FM radio with RDS
Voice dialing
Deep Facebook integration
PlayStation Certified, access to the PS Store
Accelerometer and proximity sensor
NFC connectivity
Main disadvantages
Display has sub-par viewing angles for a flagship
Slightly thicker than main rivals
Relatively modest battery
JellyBean update not available at launch
Poor loudspeaker performance
Video recording could be better
The Sony Xperia T hasn't got the raw muscle of some of its rivals, but there's enough to get you interested. And once you go and give it a try, the design and handling will hardly let you down. In a smartphone market as crowded as today's, handsets with this much character are hard to come by. Now, a grateful nod is well in order to old allies and the Xperia Arc.
Setting record benchmark scores is one thing, but having an excellent chipset in a body that's great to look at is to many a more than even tradeoff. The Sony Xperia T should not be afraid of facing its rivals in a raw processing power battle, though it's the beauty contests it enjoys the most.


And then there's the software enhancements, to which Sony paid more than enough attention. The Android ICS on the Xperia T comes with a great-looking UI, which Sony claims is also one of the most functional around.


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ZTE Flash Full Specifications-US Mobile phone with Android ICS and Camera 12.6 MP

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One phone provider in the United States, Sprint, has just launched a new Android phone. Android mobile phone is midend from ZTE, namely ZTE Flash.

Mobile is relying on the operating system Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich as the OS on it. In addition, another advantage of this phone is a 12.6 MP primary camera is embedded in the rear. The camera is equipped with LED flash and HD video recording capabilities. To complement, there is a 1MP camera on the front.


This mobile phone comes with a screen measuring 4.5-inch IPS HD resolution. On the inside, ZTE Flash comes with a dual core 1.5GHz Qualcomm MSM8960. The performance of these processors will be supported with a 1GB RAM. For the problem of storage, the phone is 8GB of internal memory and a MicroSD slot up to 32GB supported.

In the battery, the phone offers a battery Li-Ion 1780 mAh capacity which promises durability 8 hours talk time. Other features available on this phone include Bluetooth 4.0 and support for NFC technology. Regarding the price, this phone Sprint sells for $ 130 USD.

You can look ZTE flash full specificatios here :


Overview 2G Network CDMA 800 / 1900
3G Network CDMA2000 1xEV-DO
4G Network LTE 1900
SIM Mini-SIM
Announced 2012, November
Status Available. Released 2012, November
Design Dimensions 133.9 x 65.7 x 9.7 mm (5.27 x 2.59 x 0.38 in)
Weight 142 g (5.01 oz)
  - Touch-sensitive controls
Display Type IPS LCD capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Size 720 x 1280 pixels, 4.5 inches (~326 ppi pixel density)
Multitouch Yes
Protection Corning Gorilla Glass
Ringtones Alert types Vibration, MP3, WAV ringtones
Loudspeaker Yes
3.5mm jack Yes
Storage Card slot microSD, up to 64 GB
Internal 8 GB storage, 1 GB RAM
Connectivity GPRS No
EDGE No
Speed Rev. A, up to 3.1 Mbps; LTE, Cat3, 50 Mbps UL, 100 Mbps DL
WLAN Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n, Wi-Fi Direct, DLNA, Wi-Fi hotspot
Bluetooth Yes, v4.0 with A2DP
NFC Yes
USB Yes, microUSB v2.0
Camera Primary 12.6 MP, autofocus, LED flash
Features Geo-tagging, face detection
Video Yes, 1080p@30fps
Secondary Yes, 1 MP
Platform OS Android OS, v4.0.4 (Ice Cream Sandwich)
Chipset Qualcomm MSM8960 Snapdragon
CPU Dual-core 1.5 GHz Krait
GPU Adreno 225
Features Sensors Accelerometer, gyro, proximity, compass
Messaging SMS (threaded view), MMS, Email, Push Email
Browser HTML5
Radio TBD
GPS Yes, with A-GPS support
Java Yes, via Java MIDP emulator
Colors Black
- SNS integration
- Active noise cancellation with dedicated mic
- MP4/DivX/Xvid/H.263/H.264/WMV player
- MP3/eAAC+/WMA/WAV player
- Organizer
- Document viewer
- Voice memo/dial/commands
- Predictive text input
Battery Standard battery, Li-Ion 1780 mAh
Stand-by Up to 216 h
Talk time Up to 8 h




Source : GSMarena.com
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